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Archive for the ‘Domain Registrars’ Category

Google Offers has 50% off at Go Daddy

October 17, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, godaddy.com, google offersComments Off on Google Offers has 50% off at Go Daddy

“Daily” deal offers half off at Go Daddy.

Google Offers — Google’s answer to Groupon — has a deal going on right now that will be interesting to domainers.

I just got an email from the service about an offer for Go Daddy. You can see it here.

The offer is $10 for $20 toward domain names, hosting, and other services at Go Daddy.

The 50% discount offer must be purchased within the next 10 days. It can be redeemed anytime between now and April 1, 2013 and must be redeemed in a single purchase.

I don’t see anything in the fine print that would preclude using the $20 toward domain renewals, but I may be missing something.

This is the first time I recall a major daily deals sited offering a discount at a domain name registrar.

Google and Go Daddy have a long running partnership for domain registrations.


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Could Twitter identify the best domain registrars?

October 11, 2012domain registrar reviews, Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, kevin ohashi, sentiment analysisComments Off on Could Twitter identify the best domain registrars?

The sentiment of your tweets may suggest which domain name registrars are best.

Review SignalA few weeks ago TechCrunch wrote about Kevin Ohashi’s new web hosting review site ReviewSignal.com.

(If Ohashi’s name rings a bell, Ohashi is a Domain Name Wire reader and you may have seen some of his comments on the site before.)

TechCrunch titled its post “Web Hosting Reviews Are A Cesspool. Review Signal Wants To Fix That”.

If you’ve ever searched for web hosting reviews then you will likely agree with the title. They’re a joke, mostly made of biased affiliate sites that get paid when you sign up for a hosting plan.

To solve that, ReviewSignal.com uses sentiment analysis from tweets to determine which web hosts are best.

Since Ohashi has a background in domain names — and web hosting and domains go together — does that mean the site will eventually rate domain registrars as well?

Ohashi says he may expand from just web hosting reviews to domain names as well. But it will be a monumental task. Ohashi told me he went through between 10k-20k tweets manually to train machine learning systems and understand the data as a human before he was able to release the hosting reviews. Sentiment analysis on hosting won’t be exactly the same as domains, and it will take a lot of work to prepare.

I hope Ohashi goes through the effort, as I think the results would be very interesting.


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Doh! Melbourne IT accidentally shut down Twitter’s t.co link shortener

October 9, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, Melbourne IT, t.co, twitterComments Off on Doh! Melbourne IT accidentally shut down Twitter’s t.co link shortener

Company placed domain status on hold thanks to phishing complaint.

Yesterday Twitter’s t.co link shortener, which it wraps all outgoing links in, went down.

Was the culprit some self-proclaimed anonymous user? Or a DDoS?

Nope. Domain name registrar Melbourne IT has fessed up to causing the problem.

The company, which is the registrar for t.co, admitted to CNET that one of its employees had temporarily taken the t.co domain name offline in response to a phishing complaint.

Yesterday in the process of actioning a phishing complaint, our policy team inadvertently placed the t.co domain on hold. The error was realized and rectified in approximately 40 minutes and t.co links again began working.

Whoops.

Hopefully the registrar will enact protections to prevent this from happening again.


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Sedo expands distribution partnership with Go Daddy

September 26, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, godaddy.com, sedo, sedomlsComments Off on Sedo expands distribution partnership with Go Daddy

“Make Offer” domains now distributed to Go Daddy through SedoMLS.

Sedo announced today that it has expanded its distribution partnership with Go Daddy to include “make offer” domain names.

In January Go Daddy joined the SedoMLS network. That meant that fixed priced domains at Sedo that were opted into SedoMLS would show up in the registration path at GoDaddy.com. Go Daddy customers could purchase the domains by following a link to Go Daddy Auctions.

The expanded partnership means domains listed on SedoMLS without a price will also be promoted within the GoDaddy.com registration path. Customers can complete the negotiations and purchase through their Go Daddy account.

The deal is similar to one with Afternic, which was expanded in July.

Although the ratio has been changing quickly in recent years, Sedo has always had a high number of unpriced domain names. This new deal will give significant exposure to domain names listed on SedoMLS.


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Go Daddy patents “announcing a domain name registration on a social website”

September 25, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, patents, social networking patentComments Off on Go Daddy patents “announcing a domain name registration on a social website”

Patent describes way to announce your latest domain name registration.

Last year I wrote about Go Daddy’s patent applications related to announcing a domain name registration on a social network.

Today the United States Patent and Trademark office granted the domain name registrar a patent for “announcing a domain name registration on a social website”.

U.S. patent number 8,276,057 (pdf) describes a way in which a domain name registrar account could be connected to a social network such as Facebook. After a user registered domain name, the user could set a delay period before which an announcement about the registration would be made on the social network. The system could also track traffic driven by the social network posting.

The patent says the purpose of this announcement could be to drive traffic to a newly created web site or even a parked page. (Of course, driving traffic by this way to a parked page would be frowned upon by domain parking companies.)


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Class action lawsuit filed over Go Daddy downtime

September 20, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy class action, GoDaddy, godaddy class action, godaddy downComments Off on Class action lawsuit filed over Go Daddy downtime

Lawsuit claims seeks damages for downtime on September 10.

Well, that was quick.

The first federal lawsuit seeking class action status has been filed against GoDaddy for its downtime on September 10 (pdf). The outage affected GoDaddy.com and many people who used the company’s DNS and web hosting services.

The suit was filed by Eric Mitchell, who runs the web site StatedIncomeIsBack.com. He claims Go Daddy failed to “satisfy its guaranteed upload (sic) times for customers’ Domain Name Service (“DNS”), web sites and email accounts…”

Mitchell claims that Go Daddy violated its 99.9% uptime guarantee for hosting. The suit notes that Go Daddy’s services can only be down for 43.2 minutes in a thirty day period to meet the guarantee. He also cites the company’s 99.999% uptime guarantee for its Premium DNS Manager, a product that it’s not clear if he was using.

Of course, Go Daddy’s guarantees include language that defines what the customer is entitled to if the uptime guarantee is not met.

The legal agreement on GoDaddy.com refers to the 99.9% webhosting uptime guarantee and the remedy:

“you may contact Go Daddy and request a credit of 5% of your monthly hosting fee from Go Daddy for that month. The credit may be used only for the purchase of further products and services from Go Daddy, and is exclusive of any applicable taxes.”

For Premium DNS Manager, the guarantee states that customers will get a service credit for two months for any affected services. However, the terms note that you must open a ticket to request this credit.

Mitchell says that he was only offered a 30% discount off of new products or renewals. According to the suit, other people were offered account credits but they were not applied automatically. (My reading of Go Daddy’s policies is that credits will not be automatically applied and the customer has to request them.)

The plaintiff in this case has a penchant for filing lawsuits whenever a service provider drops the ball. He appears to be the same plaintiff in an action against RIM for a blackberry outage. It’s also the same law firm.


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Go Daddy gets patent for SEO and search engine submission

September 18, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, godaddy.com, search engine optimization, SEOComments Off on Go Daddy gets patent for SEO and search engine submission

Patent covers method and systems for SEO suggestions and search engine submission.

The United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued a patent (pdf) to Go Daddy for “method for improving a web site’s ranking with search engines”.

U.S. patent number 8,271,488 describes a system for helping web site owners edit their web pages for better search results and then automatically submitting the sites to multiple search engines.

If some of this seems outdated, that’s because the patent application was filed in 2003.

The images in the patent show Go Daddy’s former search engine product called Traffic Blazer. The company now offers a product called search engine visibility that has similar functions.

The patent describes a method where a web site owner wants to rank for certain keywords in a search engine. The system makes suggestions to the site owner on how to edit his or her web site to rank better for these keywords, such as add the word to the title tag. It then automatically submits the sites to multiple search engines.

In another embodiment, the system would automatically edit the customer’s web page for better search engine rankings.

A number of businesses still offer search engine submission services, even though the importance of submitting a site for inclusion in search engines has decreased over the past decade. Automatically analyzing web sites and making suggestions for better search rankings is still popular, although much of the attention has shifted from what’s on the web site to external factors like who’s linking to it.


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Like I was saying… Go Daddy wasn’t hacked or attacked

September 11, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off on Like I was saying… Go Daddy wasn’t hacked or attacked

Guy on twitter says he took Go Daddy down. Press bites.

Yesterday dozens (hundreds?) of “respectable” publications reported that Go Daddy was hacked, and that it was done by a hacker who was part of anonymous.

This morning I tweeted:

“incredible how major news outlets take as fact what a single twitter user said about yesterday’s #GoDaddy attack.”

I followed up a few minutes later noting that “attack” wasn’t the right word:

“I should clarify re: GoDaddy — shouldn’t even use word “attack” yet, could be something else entirely”

Indeed, Go Daddy has now confirmed it was an internal issue. It wasn’t attacked. Here’s what the company had to say just moments ago:

Yesterday, GoDaddy.com and many of our customers experienced intermittent service outages starting shortly after 10 a.m. PDT. Service was fully restored by 4 p.m. PDT.

The service outage was not caused by external influences. It was not a “hack” and it was not a denial of service attack (DDoS). We have determined the service outage was due to a series of internal network events that corrupted router data tables. Once the issues were identified, we took corrective actions to restore services for our customers and GoDaddy.com. We have implemented measures to prevent this from occurring again.

So basically some guy with a Twitter account says he’s part of Anonymous and that he was responsible for the outage, and big publications took him at his word.

Sigh.

If you want someone to blame for the outage, apparently it’s Karl.


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Like I was saying… Go Daddy wasn’t hacked or attacked

September 11, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off on Like I was saying… Go Daddy wasn’t hacked or attacked

Guy on twitter says he took Go Daddy down. Press bites.

Yesterday dozens (hundreds?) of “respectable” publications reported that Go Daddy was hacked, and that it was done by a hacker who was part of anonymous.

This morning I tweeted:

“incredible how major news outlets take as fact what a single twitter user said about yesterday’s #GoDaddy attack.”

I followed up a few minutes later noting that “attack” wasn’t the right word:

“I should clarify re: GoDaddy — shouldn’t even use word “attack” yet, could be something else entirely”

Indeed, Go Daddy has now confirmed it was an internal issue. It wasn’t attacked. Here’s what the company had to say just moments ago:

Yesterday, GoDaddy.com and many of our customers experienced intermittent service outages starting shortly after 10 a.m. PDT. Service was fully restored by 4 p.m. PDT.

The service outage was not caused by external influences. It was not a “hack” and it was not a denial of service attack (DDoS). We have determined the service outage was due to a series of internal network events that corrupted router data tables. Once the issues were identified, we took corrective actions to restore services for our customers and GoDaddy.com. We have implemented measures to prevent this from occurring again.

So basically some guy with a Twitter account says he’s part of Anonymous and that he was responsible for the outage, and big publications took him at his word.

Sigh.

If you want someone to blame for the outage, apparently it’s Karl.


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Have ccTLD questions? Just ask Alex

September 11, 2012ccTLDs, country code domain names, Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, opensrs, TucowsComments Off on Have ccTLD questions? Just ask Alex

Get answers to your toughest country code domain questions.

Alex Schwertner OpenSRSSome country code domain names are fairly easy to register. Most of them aren’t.

Frankly, figuring out how to register some of the more obscure ccTLDs could take a Ph.D.

But now there’s a free resource for all of your ccTLD questions: Ask Alex.

It’s a new section on Tucows’ OpenSRS web site where company employee Alex Schwertner answers all of your questions about ccTLDs.

Residency requirements? What forms do I need to fax? What documents do I need to provide? You get the idea.

Tucows bolstered its ccTLD registration options when it acquired EPAG last year. Schwertner was an EPAG employee who now works for Tucows.

Ask Alex is a free resource and anyone can ask questions, whether you intend to register your domains through OpenSRS or another registrar.


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