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.Best top level domain sold to entrepreneur who wants to make it a cryptocurrency play

July 19, 2018Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off on .Best top level domain sold to entrepreneur who wants to make it a cryptocurrency play

Adding crypto to a new TLD? Why not.

PeopleBrowsr has sold the top level domain name .best to The Best SAS, a Paris based company led by Cyril Fremont.

According to a release, .best will become “a core component of a core component of a decentralized search optimized social network, where participants will be rewarded with .Best cryptocurrency for reviewing best in class products and services.:

“We are giving the consumer their own domain name, an integrated website where they own the data, and rewards for their contribution to the community. Platforms like ours continue to move negotiating power between reviewers and sellers,” said Cyril Fremont.

It seems that the goal is to have people review products on .best domain names and reward them with the company’s cryptocurrency.

The Best SAS is owned in part by PREMLEAD, an online marketing company creates leads using a network of over 50,000 websites.

I’ll give this idea points for innovation, something that has mostly been lacking when it comes to new top level domain names.

PeopleBrowsr also runs the .CEO domain name and the “dot brand” domain .kred. None of its top level domains have proven successful, with both .CEO and .Best having about 2,500 names in their zone files.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

ICANN Working Group: Registrants Must Retain the Right to Defend Their Domains in Court

July 19, 2018Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off on ICANN Working Group: Registrants Must Retain the Right to Defend Their Domains in Court

In this post, the Internet Commerce Association provides an update on a plan to give IGOs special privileges related to domain names.

Should domain name registrants’ fundamental right, the right to go to court to overrule a UDRP decision transferring their domain name, be taken away? That was one of the primary questions that an ICANN Working Group was mandated to answer. The confusingly named ICANN IGO-INGO Access to Curative Rights Protection Mechanisms (the “Working Group”) has been examining and reviewing this issue since 2013 and just issued its Final Report.

ICANN had been considering creating a new dispute resolution system, just for Intergovernmental Organizations (IGO’s) such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), and the World Customs Organization, and also for International Non-governmental Organizations (INGO’s), such as Good Neighbours International (GNI), CARE, and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWFN). These organizations and many others who use acronyms and common words in their names, would be interested in any new system that would allow them to take away corresponding domain names from registrants. Some IGOs believed that they should have first right to domains that matched their acronym, even in .com, such as to the domain WHO.com.

The Working Group was presented with, as one option, a new dispute resolution system that would be “final”, without recourse by a registrant to go to court to overturn an unfair decision. Although such a proposal has been previously raised and rejected, the Government Advisory Committee (GAC), pushed hard for it to be reconsidered. IGOs in particular argued that they currently enjoy immunity from going to court for most kinds of disputes, and wanted that immunity extended to domain name disputes. Their rationale was that as intergovernmental organizations, their immunity from being subjected to courts of any particular nation was imperative, and the UDRP as currently enacted requires all complainants to submit to a court’s jurisdiction for any dispute challenging a UDRP transfer order. Accordingly, IGOs claimed that they could not effectively use the UDRP as it would require them to waive their immunity.

It was pointed out to them, however, that they can and should be able to bring a UDRP via an agent or licensee, rather than directly themselves, in order to avoid having to submit to a court’s jurisdiction, and as such, the UDRP was perfectly equipped to handle a dispute involving an IGO.

The prospect of a new UDRP specifically for IGOs, which would enable them to target acronym domains and/or single word domains, without the right of appeal to the courts, was very concerning to domain registrants. The ICA engaged in the Working Group reviewing the IGO UDRP proposal since 2013, first represented by former ICA General Counsel, Phil Corwin, who also served as a neutral co-Chair, and then recently by Zak Muscovitch, current General Counsel. Also participating and providing long-term support to the Working Group, were ICA Board members, Nat Cohen and Jay Chapman.

Due in large part to the ICA efforts, and due also to fierce advocacy from George Kirikos, a non-ICA member of the Working Group, the Consensus recommendation of the Working Group was not to create any new system for IGOs and INGOs which would take away a registrant’s right to go to court. The ICA is pleased that the Working Group reached Consensus on this issue, amongst several other important issues, including inter alia:

a) that no substantive changes to the UDRP or URS are to be made, and no new dispute resolution procedures are to be created, for INGOs;

b) that IGOs can avail themselves of the UDRP and URS by way of filing a Complaint through an agent or licensee so as to not have to submit to jurisdiction of courts;

c) that no subsidies are to be provided to IGOs or INGOs; and

d) when a domain owner challenges a UDRP or URS decision in court and an IGO responds by successfully asserting to the court that it is immune from any court proceedings and thereby avoids having the UDRP or URS decision challenged under national law, that the original UDRP or URS will be set aside, so that registrant’s right to judicial review is not taken away.

While the final decision is up to the GNSO council, it is hoped and expected that GNSO will adopt the Consensus recommendations of its Working Group who has carefully studied the issues for years.

It is just this kind of sustained, multi-year effort to engage in ICANN’s policy making process that is required to protect registrants and the domain industry from damaging policies that are continually proposed at ICANN. The ICA is the only association that engaged in this process to protect the interests of registrants and the domain name investment industry. The ICA wishes to acknowledge and thank the Working Group’s Chair, Petter Rindforth, and the Working Group’s former Chair, Phil Corwin (formerly ICA General Counsel), for their longstanding dedication to Working Group and its efforts to review and develop policy on this important subject matter. The ICA wishes to also thank ICANN staff, Mary Wong and Steve Chan, for their longstanding support of the Working Group, as well as Susan Kawaguchi who has served as GNSO liaison to the Working Group. The ICA wishes to extend its particular gratitude to its General Counsel, Zak Muscovitch, as well as ICA Board Members Nat Cohen and Jay Chapman, who each have admirably and extensively participated in and contributed to the WG’s achievements.

The ICA will continue to vigorously represent domain name registrants and protect their rights, including the right to go to court to overturn an errant URS or UDRP decision. When the UDRP was originally established in 1999, there was a “grand bargain” wherein trademark owners would be able to avail themselves of a streamlined and low-cost dispute resolution system for clear cut cases of abusive domain name registrations, but domain name owners would not have to give up their right to go to a national court in order to overturn a wrongly decided UDRP case. Over the years, we have seen the UDRP successfully adjudicate thousands of clear cut cases. But we have also, with unfortunate regularity, seen the UDRP abused by trademark owners and errant panelists, to take away lawfully and fairly registered domain names. Concerningly, instances of Reverse Domain Name Hijacking against registrants is on the rise. These valid concerns exist irrespective of whether the registrant’s ownership of its domain is challenged by a trademark owner or an IGO. Under such circumstances, the registrant’s fundamental right to go to court must be protected.

Zak Muscovitch is General Counsel to the Internet Commerce Association, a group that advocates on behalf of domain name investors.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Building a site on Squarespace

July 19, 2018Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off on Building a site on Squarespace

Hopefully you read my overview of sitebuilders including Wix, Weebly and Squarespace. In today’s post, I’m going to explain how I built a site on Squarespace.

(I want to be clear up front that I’m not ranking the site builders. I built different types of sites on each service, and my goal is to explain how the process worked for me.)

I used a newly-registered domain name for my site: Bartending.school. It was a premium domain name, but the $220-a-year price tag seemed reasonable given the high search volumes for bartending school topics.

Like the other site builders, Squarespace didn’t ask me about a domain name before I got started. Instead, I selected a template and started building the site. It wasn’t until I was ready to publish that I had to select my domain and pay for anything.

Building

I selected a template and started building out my site. Overall, Squarespace was extremely easy to learn and use. There were a couple of site design procedures that confused me a bit, such as editing the top menu and the sections of the website. In one instance, I couldn’t figure out how to exit out of a screen and ended up hitting the back button. But Squarespace has good help pages that walked me through the few hurdles I faced.

I particularly like the ease of making sitewide changes to fonts and text sizes through the style editor.

Change text size, color and font sitewide through the Style Editor.

My site takes advantage of regular pages as well as blog pages. Squarespace’s built-in blog system has few of the bells and whistles you get with WordPress. But, keeping with the simplicity, it’s easy to use.

The Squarespace blog editor.

Blog pages are also compatible with AMP, which could help you get more traffic for Google.

While Wix has “apps” that can be plugged into your site similar to what Shopify offers, all of Squarespace’s apps (called integrations) are available by default. You can see them here.

I spent quite a bit of time building the site because I drafted all of the content from scratch. But once I got the hang of Squarespace, adding new content was very easy.

 

Packages

Squarespace makes you pay before you can publish (some competitors let you published a branded-site on a subdomain without paying).

Here’s the pricing for regular (not e-commerce) websites:

Personal Plan – $16 a month or $144 a year.
Business Plan – $26 a month or $216 a year.

The business plan adds additional features including the ability to add some customized code to your header and in the site. It also comes with some ecommerce capabilities, although for those you might want to opt for one of the dedicated e-commerce packages.

The customized code injection and code blocks in the business plan will be necessary if you want to add third-party javascript widgets such as Adsense. But, as with all of these site builders, you can’t edit code line-by-line.

It’s worth noting that Squarespace doesn’t offer email. Instead, it has a partnership with Google to offer G Suite’s basic plan. This is typical for site builders.

After selecting a plan, I connected my domain bartending.school to the website by adding DNS records at my domain registrars. A free domain comes with all annual packages. (Of course, not a premium one like bartending.school.)

Publishing and Promoting

Once your site is built, any changes you make to the site will instantly be published when you save them.

Squarespace integrates directly with Google Search Console. Once your site is built you can click a few buttons to add it to Search Console. Your sitemap will automatically be submitted as well.

Once nice feature is that you can access much of your Search Console data from directly within the Analytics section of Squarespace.

Overall

I am very impressed by Squarespace. Just looking at my site, It’s much more professional looking that something I could have created in the same amount of time with WordPress. I can see why a small business would opt to use Squarespace as opposed to WordPress.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

.Best top level domain sold to entrepreneur who wants to make it a cryptocurrency play

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on .Best top level domain sold to entrepreneur who wants to make it a cryptocurrency play
 Domain Name Wire: Adding crypto to a new TLD? Why not. PeopleBrowsr has sold the top level domain name .best to The Best SAS, a Paris based company led by Cyril Fremont. According to a release, .best will become “a core component of a core component of a decentralized search optimized social network, where participants will be rewarded […]...

Three Letter Blockbuster Domain Sale, ICE.com Trades Hands for $3.5 Million

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on Three Letter Blockbuster Domain Sale, ICE.com Trades Hands for $3.5 Million
 StrategicRevenue.com: NEW YORK, NY – According to a press release, the three letter Internet domain name ICE.com has been sold via a private, confidential transaction in the amount of $3.5 million. The sale is expected to be the largest publicly disclosed domain name sold in 2018. The sale was handled by two domain and Internet business […]

Mike Mann sells 7 domains in June for $113,664 (HumanAbility[.]com, Viago[.]com, etc.)

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on Mike Mann sells 7 domains in June for $113,664 (HumanAbility[.]com, Viago[.]com, etc.)
 OnlineDomain.com: Mike Mann reported selling 7 domain names in June for a total of $113,664. Prices started at $4,000 and went up to $32,000. All 7 of the sold domains were .com. The average reported domain sales price was $16,238. Here is a look at some of Mike Mann’s domain sales and acquisitions from June 2018. … The post Mike Mann sells 7 do...

Looks Like Intercontinental Exchange Acquired ICE.com for $3.5m

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on Looks Like Intercontinental Exchange Acquired ICE.com for $3.5m
 DomainInvesting.com: I was unable to participate in the press conference call held to announce the $3.5 million sale of Ice.com. Before the news of the domain name sale broke on DNJournal and other outlets, I had a couple of guesses about who may have been behind the purchase, but the buyer was not named. In the DNJournal article, Ron wrote about how bro...

ICANN Working Group: Registrants Must Retain the Right to Defend Their Domains in Court

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on ICANN Working Group: Registrants Must Retain the Right to Defend Their Domains in Court
 Domain Name Wire: In this post, the Internet Commerce Association provides an update on a plan to give IGOs special privileges related to domain names. Should domain name registrants’ fundamental right, the right to go to court to overrule a UDRP decision transferring their domain name, be taken away? That was one of the primary questions that an [...

How to stay safe online

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on How to stay safe online
 Gen.XYZ: Whether you’re a casual internet browser, a parent teaching your children how to use the computer, or an experienced website designer, we all share the fear of losing sensitive documents or personal information to a hacker. Fortunately, there are many online safety precautions you can take that don’t require too much effort. Here are...

Responsible and Prudent UDRP Panels Decline to Draw Conclusions in the Absence of Clear and Suffi…

July 19, 2018DomainingComments Off on Responsible and Prudent UDRP Panels Decline to Draw Conclusions in the Absence of Clear and Suffi…
 Internet Commerce Association: In the recent case concerning Chatroulette.org , the Panel demonstrated the responsible and prudent approach in evaluating evidence in the UDRP. The Panel stated as follows: “The Panel takes the view that the Respondent’s denial of knowledge of the existence of the Complainant and his trade mark at that date is credible e...