NameStarter.com :: domaining business blog // Domaining for Domainers

Archive for the ‘Domainnamewire’ Category

Harvard sues frequent UDRP loser to have its domains disabled

May 28, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Company that lost four UDRP complaints if filed against others might be at risk of losing its own domain name.

Harvard has sued a handful of companies it says have copied its trademarked exam questions.

Among these companies is one that lost four UDRP cases in a single week — Certplex, Ltd.

Certplex lost four UDRPs for domain names including the term “Braindumps”. One of Certplex’s sites offering test prep is Braindumps.com.

According to the complaint filed by Harvard, Certplex publishes actual questions from past exams, or near copies of the questions. Braindumps.com pretty much explains that this is its product’s selling point.

Harvard alleges that Certplex has published actual exam questions (or “substantially similar” questions) from the Harvard Business School online program HBX and its CORe Exams.

Harvard is asking the courts to transfer the defendants’ domain names, including Braindumps.com, to its control. It lists a number of other sites that it alleges Certplex owns, such as ActualAnswers.com, CertKiller.com and ExamSheets.com. While all of these domain names currently have whois proxy, historical records from DomainTools show that Certplex has owned the domains at one time.

Imagine that: a company that tried to take others’ “braindumps” domains might be at risk of losing its own.

Harvard Certplex lawsuit



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

FTC to ICANN on .Sucks: Yeah, we told you this would happen

May 28, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

FTC wants ICANN to address overarching issues with new TLDs rather than one-off cases.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has responded to ICANN’s request that it investigate the practices of top level domain name registry Vox Populi over its rollout of the .sucks domain name.

I’d summarize its response as: “yeah, we told you this would happen with your rollout of new TLDs”.

FTC’s Chairwoman Edith Ramirez wrote (pdf) that the FTC cannot comment on the existence of any pending investigations, yet noted that the FTC will “monitor the actions of registries and other actors in this arena”.

She reminded ICANN that it brought up many of these consumer protection issues during the process of designing the new top level domain name program:

At the same time, the questions you and [President of Intellectual Property Committee] Mr. Shatan have posed regarding Vox Populi’s .SUCKS rollout raise important and broader consumer protection issues that the Commission previously highlighted prior to the launch of ICANN’s new gTLD program. Indeed, Mr. Shatan observed that other registries have also engaged in troubling tactics, even if not as egregious as those of Vox Populi. In view of the exponential expansion of gTLDs, these are not issues that can be feasibly addressed on a case-by-case basis. I therefore urge ICANN to consider ways in which it can address the concerns raised with respect to .SUCKS, as well as consumer protection issues more generally, on a broader basis.

I read this to say that the FTC doesn’t plan to pursue Vox Populi, and would instead like ICANN to fix “holes” in its program.

Ramirez then makes several specific recommendations, the first of which would be highly controversial: that site owners “prominently identify themselves to the public on their individual websites so that people do not confuse an “activist” site with a company-owned site”.

Although she was using .sucks as an example, this is a far reaching suggestion that I think a lot of “activists” would oppose. .Sucks aside, being an activist sometimes requires anonymity.

Ramirez also encourages ICANN to make sure the rights protections mechanisms for new domain names perform their intended functions and to reevaluate top level domain names targeted to highly regulated industries, such as banks and pharmacies.

Vox Populi has come under fire over .Sucks for charging brand holders stiff premiums to register their domain names before other people do.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

NAF panel orders transfer of FatTuesday.com to owner of Fat-Tuesday.com

May 28, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Panel really screwed this one up.

Fat TuesdayA three person National Arbitration Forum panel has ordered the transfer of the domain name FatTuesday.com to David Briggs Enterprises, Inc. The complainant operates bars under the name Fat Tuesday and uses the inferior domain name Fat-Tuesday.com.

Of course, Fat Tuesday is also the name for what many of us think of as Mardi Gras. Mardi Gras is French for “Fat Tuesday”. Type “Fat Tuesday” into Google, and it duly pops up the date of this holiday.

Amazingly, the three person panel of Sheri L. Falco, Darryl C. Wilson and Terry F. Peppard seemed to ignore the fact that this domain name exactly matches the name of a holiday.

The panel was apparently miffed that the domain name was somehow transferred after notice of the UDRP was filed. I don’t think the domain name was technically transferred to a new owner, but it really doesn’t matter. There’s no way the panel should have found that the domain name was registered and used in bad faith.

The domain name — which exactly matches a holiday — has been inactive for many years. The complainant pointed out that the domain name sold for $16,500 in 2007. The owner of the domain name, unsurprisingly, asked for more to sell the domain name.

The panel wrote:

Indeed that Respondent’s registration of the domain name was in service of an attempt to extract from Complainant a price of $100,000.00 or more from the sale of an inactive domain name, which is a price demonstrably in excess of Respondent’s proven costs in acquiring and maintaining the domain name, falls squarely within the parameters of Policy 4(b)(i), which identifies circumstances in which it may be found that a domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith as that term is understood in the Policy.

No, no and no. It’s THE NAME OF A HOLIDAY! It doesn’t matter if a company has been able to also trademark the name for limited purposes.

You can read the case decision here.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Domain definitions: Registrar and Registry

May 27, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

The definition of registry is becoming fuzzy.

Two of the most commonly misused words in mainstream articles about domain names are registrar and registry. Many publications use one when it should be the other.

A registrar is the company where you register a domain name, such as GoDaddy or Name.com.

A registry is the company that manages the top level domain name.

So if you register a .com domain name at GoDaddy, GoDaddy is the registrar and Verisign is the registry for the domain name.

Now, most DNW readers are aware of this. But I’ve started to run into a conundrum with the release of new top level domain names.

With new TLDs, there are often two companies referred to as registries.

For example, .Buzz is “owned” and marketed by dotStrategy. But the traditional technical registry tasks are handled by Neustar, the same company that is the registry for .biz and .us

Are both considered registries?

In this case, I often call Neustar the “back end registry provider” or the “technical registry provider”, but these terms are cumbersome. Sometimes I refer to dotStrategy as the “TLD operator” and Neustar as the “registry”.

I don’t have a good answer to this yet, but I am open to suggestions.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

What Fadi Chehadé should do in his last year as ICANN’s CEO

May 27, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Here’s what companies and people want to see ICANN’s outgoing CEO accomplish before he leaves the post.

ICANN CEO Fadi Chehadé made the surprise announcement last week that he would step down from his role as CEO of the organization next March. I reached out to a number of companies and people in the ICANN community to ask what they would most like to see Chehadé accomplish in this last ten months at the head of the internet group.

Elliot Noss, CEO of Tucows:

If Fadi were to take practical steps to get registrars, registries, IP and law enforcement working together more effectively I think that could have the most lasting impact.

He should pick a single issue, it could be privacy and proxy, it could be registrant validation, and lead an effort to successful completion. This would show it could be done and that multi-stakeholder is not win-lose politics as usual. This could be the legacy of his tenure.

Everyone pays attention to the IANA process. It will go forward with or without Fadi’s involvement.

Jon Nevett, EVP Corporate Affairs, Donuts:

Fadi has the opportunity to successfully complete his strong tenure by focusing on the two major initiatives: the IANA transition and the new gTLD program.

The transition won’t be fully complete by his departure, but he must focus the community on developing credible accountability mechanisms before setting the organization on a final course to finish the transition.

The current gTLD round must be completed before he leaves—some gTLDs still are unresolved, including all of the TLDs impacted by GAC Category 2. For the program to reach its ultimate potential, this logjam needs to be cleared and deserves Fadi’s attention.

Becky Burr, Deputy General Counsel and Chief Privacy Officer, Neustar:

Bring the IANA stewardship transition across the finish line by supporting the community’s consensus development processes and embracing proposed community empowerment and accountability reforms. In addition, deliver on ICANN’s promises to enhance operational excellence.

Kurt Pritz, Domain Name Association:

Fadi has the opportunity to move several important initiatives from “in-process” to “complete.”

Commit significant resources to address Universal Acceptance issues. Domain names and email addresses must work everywhere. Only ICANN is resourced and situated to immediately support this urgent communications effort.

Complete the gTLD round: launch all remaining new domain name registries (push to resolve all remaining contention sets). ICANN should resolve outstanding Policy questions that have slowed these new businesses: registration of two-letter names, operation of open/closed domain name registries, and GAC “Category 2” applications.

Fadi should support industry led initiatives to combat domain name abuses rather than rely on difficult to form contract provisions and ICANN compliance.

Finally, implement effective, community-developed accountability mechanisms as a pre-requisite to completing the IANA transition.

Michele Neylon, CEO of Blacknight:

With 10 months left in his tenure I suspect it’ll be quite hard for him to accomplish any new goals, but there are several projects that he should be able to bring close to completion.

The two main ones would be the IANA transition and the work on accountability. Leaving ICANN early next year in a position where the IANA transition away from the US government could be considered a “done deal” would be a worthy achievement. It is, unfortunately, unlikely that the actual transition will happen before Fadi leaves.

And the only way that the transition can realistically proceed is if the “accountability’ work is completed. In other words, that broad community feels that ICANN as an organisation has matured enough to be accountable for its actions.

Feel free to leave a comment about what you’d like to see ICANN accomplish before he leaves.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

15 end user domain name purchases

May 27, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

An accessories company, law firm and trade publisher bought domain names last week.

Sedo had 598 domain name transactions last week for a total of $1.1 million. Two likely end user sales aren’t on this list because they have whois privacy or are still in transfer: MyFood.com at $33,500 and FBet.com at €50,000. Neither domain name resolves to an active website yet, but we’ll probably find out who the buyers in the coming months.

Below are 15 end user domain name sales at Sedo from the past week

(You can view previous lists like this here. If you’d like to learn how to sell your domain names like these on Sedo, download this report.)

AttorneyGroup.com $20,000 – American Injury Attorney Group decided it was time to drop the hyphen in its Attorney-Group.com domain name.

Bando.com $19,999 – Ban.do Designs LLC, seller of womens’ accessories. Despite branding itself as Ban.do, it doesn’t own Ban.do. It has instead used the domain name ShopBando.com until now.

Deziro.com €4,500 – DeGiro B.V. in Amsterdam bought this domain name. Perhaps it views it as a typo.

MijnHostway.nl €6,000 – Hosting company Hostway. Mijn means “my” in Dutch.

DruckProfis.ch €2,500 – as best I can tell, Druckerei AG Suhr sells calendars. Profis means “professional” in German. Perhaps one of our German readers can clarify.

Benidorm.travel €1,600 – Viajes Alameda, s.a., a travel agent. Benidorm is in Spain.

SunniesStudio.com $799 – Sunnies Studios, a Manila company that owns SunniesStudios.com.

DrWhittiker.com $700 – CitizenHawk bought this typo on behalf of Healthy Directions, which owns the DrWhitaker.com domain name.

Snowsoft.com $3,000 – Sandhill Publishers, which publishes trade media such as Machinery Trader and Tractor House.

AuthID.com $1,000 – TrustAsia Technologies, Inc. The company’s website features Symantec products.

Team-Up.net – $800 Software company ESTsoft bought this domain name, perhaps for one of its new products.

My-Hub.com $1,500 – Hub International Limited, an insurance broker.

iLocalDeals.com $1,500 – iLocal Media, a local marketing company.

TheArtLovers.com $995 – The Art Scouts Gallery, a contemporary art gallery in Berlin.

Crestron.net $2,200 – Automation systems company Crestron bought the .net to match its existing .com domain name.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Sold! New domain name auctions with Sheel Mohnot – DNW Podcast #34

May 26, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

How hundreds of new top level domain name conflicts were settled.

Domain Name Wire podcastWhich company has facilitated the most (dollar wise) domain name auctions over the past couple years? It’s not the regular industry marketplaces. Instead, it’s Innovative Auctions, the company that has handled over 100 auctions in the past couple years to settle new top level domain name contention sets. On this episode, biz dev lead Sheel Mohnot talks about the success of these auctions and what’s next for his company now that most of these new TLD contention sets have been resolved.

Also: ICANN CEO quitting, Flippa acquires Domain Holdings, Frank Schilling and Daniel Negari hookup for auto domain names, free and cheap new domain names flooding the market.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, or click play below or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

This week’s new TLDs: .Apartments

May 26, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

You can move into a .apartments domain name this week.

Donuts releases one domain name in regularly-priced general availability this week and some good ones enter Early Access.

.Apartments launches on Wednesday, with many registrars offering prices around $50. This should be a great domain name for geo domains. You might want to look for lesser-known location names and state abbreviations. For example, you can pick up TX.apartments (short for Texas) at a premium price of about $150 per year. (You might as well register it in EAP today if you want it; the first year price is about the same.)

I think .apartments will do quite well.

Three other Donuts domains enter Early Access on Wednesday: .School, .Football and .Casino.

.School seems like a good domain name for private schools, although some colleges might also consider it. It can also be used for any educational site, such as SEO.school.

.Football will be interesting to watch and see if it’s more popular in the U.S. (American football and the NFL) or for the kind of football you actually play with your foot. This domain should do better than .Tennis given the number of teams. .Tennis launched last week and has about 800 registrations.

.Casino is (smartly) priced at a premium. Expect to pay $150-$200 to pick up these names in general availability.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Fred Krueger pushed out of Minds + Machines, company reports $5 million bookings

May 26, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Co-founder leaves company and will focus on his website building platform.

Minds + MachinesMinds + Machines released 2014 results today, and also announced that the board has voted co-founder Fred Krueger out of the company and his role as executive Chairman. Keith Teare, a British tech entrepreneur, will take over as Chairman.

The move doesn’t come as a complete surprise to me. Krueger has seemed more excited about his website building software, Mozart, than the core process of top level domain names. In his departure letter, he states that he will be able to focus completely on building out Mozart now that he is no longer with Minds + Machines. Mozart has been integrated into Minds + Machines’ registrar.

Krueger has not been afraid to speak his mind, and my impression is that he was very emotional about new top level domain names versus .com.

For example, in 2013 he commented on DomainIncite:

New TLD registries are going to have the last laugh as all these new TLDs crush (and I mean crush) dot com domainers. Good luck standing up to this tsunami of alternatives to your bad and overpriced domain name portfolios gentlemen…

Another interesting thing from the annual report: Minds + Machines CEO Antony Van Couvering said its registrar isn’t there to compete with other registrars.

Registries can now own registrars and vice versa. Although I’m not sure if the company has publicly stated it, I believe its goal was to build its own registrar into a viable competitor for end user registrations. Now the company says:

…we have created this registrar not to replicate or compete with the primary distribution channel – the mainstream registrars – which is a low margin and typically expensive business, but rather to have the tools to open up new distribution channels through selected affiliates and resellers.

This is a smart move. Registries need a way to drive registrations for affinity deals, but competing head-to-head with the likes of GoDaddy doesn’t make much sense and can be counterproductive.

On the financial side, Minds + Machines reported “cash revenue” for $5.0 million for 2014. Because revenue has to be recognized over time for a domain name, this resulted in $1.9 million in revenue last year. It also had gross receipts of $37.5 million from private auctions to resolve new top level domain name contention sets.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Expired domain name report: 1280.com for $26k and more

May 22, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Joseph Peterson’s weekly roundup of expired domain name sales.

The sadist in me contemplates a cruel reality TV show in which some unsuspecting person answers a knock on the door to find a camera crew pointed right at him. “John Q. Public, you’ve just won $26,010!” Rubbing the sleep from his eyes, he sees a beaming fashion model holding out to him a cartoonish bag of money. Then, just as our surprised victim reaches for that bulging prize, Alex Trebek blurts out: “Wait a sec! You let the domain expire over 10 bucks? Never mind. Come along guys; we’re done here.” And the camera crew slinks grumblingly away with the cash.

Each and every week, we could tantalize former domain owners with thousands of dollars that they flushed down the drain. Such a show would by now have run for 2 decades, simply because the general public remains oblivious to the potential value of domain names. Slow learners …

Last week at NameJet, the high expired sale was 1280.com at $26.1k. Even if we can’t precisely predict final prices, this NNNN.com category is known to sell consistently for significant amounts. If domain owners were rational and attentive, they wold always renew such domains, and the entire asset class would become undroppable.

Weeby.com is more of a surprise at $10.2k. Part of me wonders if some bidders saw a traffic leak from well known website builder Weebly.com. MedicalSoftware.com defines a cross-section between 2 enormous industries – large enough to include multiple companies. I find it unimaginable that ownership of MedicalSoftware.com wouldn’t eventually lead to at least 1 extra client, and that client would certainly be valued above the domain’s $5.3k cost.

Domain Name End $ Domain Name End $
1280.com 26010 Weeby.com 10200
MedicalSoftware.com 5300 OVOO.com 5200
CounterTerrorism.com 5099 FindANanny.com 4656
CostaMaya.com 4102 Collected.com 3850
InsulinPumps.com 3411 GolfSmart.com 3356
InfinityMedia.com 2525 COMZ.com 2300
PurpleTree.com 2205 ComeClean.com 1855
Banju.com 1766 DigiFlex.com 1601
Polster.com 1545 MissingPersons.com 1533
Neptuna.com 1500 BarberPole.com 1433
FalconRidge.com 1010 CardProcessor.com 1005
HGSL.com 1000 ANW.net 909
Lastra.com 902 WhiteRidge.com 862
Hebbes.com 859 OxfordRealEstate.com 858
Topio.com 815 IMIR.com 810
QIRO.com 805 BXV.net 800
ContinentalAirlines.com 787 HFDI.com 725
YoShop.com 710 9×5.com 700
Cinnamon.net 695 GO88.com 680
India24.com 650 Abarca.com 625
KTVD.com 610 iParticipate.com 565
InsideWashington.com 565 IHTI.com 540
PLGA.com 520 WXS.cc 520
IntrepidTrips.com 510 LMLP.com 489
CHLP.com 480 NDNE.com 470
ZYX.cc 460 PEMC.com 459
Civitas.org 420 PTJW.com 420
IEX.org 415 MNPN.com 410
AdAdvisor.com 410 FastPlumbing.com 400
TruckTrade.com 400 TGWY.com 390
Innovius.com 390 9L6.com 380
VeloMoto.com 350 AlbanyNYHotels.com 350
Visign.com 350 CustomPainters.com 339
PrimeStore.com 329 StartupPower.com 322
ZLQG.com 320 PBPL.com 319
WRZY.com 311 Ceiling.net 310
NBXG.com 309 USPatentAttorneys.com 269
KazooChamber.com 252 TATF.com 242
GHAA.com 237 Crusaders.org 232
Anpanman.com 210 TheVI.com 210
PayPerCallAds.com 180 Putas.net 180
ChildrenOnline.org 170 XGEE.com 161
WangSang.com 161 RecipeJournal.com 160
74564.com 160 987KXW.com 160
TopLimousine.com 159 PoliticalCartoons.net 149
Sprint800.com 149 AGoodBook.com 133
MessageApps.com 130 EPCAE.org 128
JerryResists.net 119 LocalFoodsConnection.org 117
Tabernacle.net 109 IrishFreeStyle.com 109
Precincts.com 101 SellMachinery.com 100
IllumiData.com 100 TheVoiceNews.com 100
BusinessOfSport.com 99 LindaTellingtonJones.com 91
777221.com 89 Uyruk.com 82
FixerHomes.com 81 RickNoriega.com 80
MobileParkingApps.com 80 BrandTune.com 80
FineMondo.com 80 MultiSitePress.com 79
DomainEm.com 79 AutoInsuranceOrlando.com 79
VegasWager.com 75 Science-Education.org 72
PlatinumMall.com 71 PeachFestival.org 71
YuanJiaoWang.com 71 Preprocessor.com 70
PilotPoetry.com 70 ApartmentGarden.com 70
EuclidTransit.org 70 JueZuan.com 69
Mercextra.com 69 PotMedicine.com 69
Sofresam.com 69

OVOO.com ($5.2k) leads the 4-letter charge, with nearly 2 dozen LLLLs in tow. 18 of those ranged from $300 to $1000, while the domainish COMZ.com climbed to $2.3k. LLLs are represented in a trio of TLDs: ANW.net ($909), BXV.net ($800), WXS.cc ($520), ZYX.cc ($460), and IEX.org ($415).

Apart from those 3-letter domains, .NET and .ORG also show up with dictionary words and phrases. Those sales fall within a typical $xxx wholesale price range: Cinnamon.net ($695), Ceiling.net ($310), Putas.net ($180), PoliticalCartoons.net ($149), Tabernacle.net ($109), Civitas.org ($420), Crusaders.org ($232), and ChildrenOnline.org ($170). “Putas” is Spanish for whores / prostitutes.

As a TLD, .ORG is closely allied with the idea of social conscience – something underlined by the 3 aforementioned sales. Colored by its suffix, ChildrenOnline.org strongly suggests the notion of internet safety. Although “crusaders” has a negative meaning throughout the Middle East, in the West it stands for any moral quest. Last but not least, “civitas” is Latin for citizenry. Whether Latin is a dead language or not, this particular word lives on in multiple brand names.

Coincidentally, Uyruk.com ($82) means “citizen” or “nationality” in Turkish. CostaMaya.com ($4.1k) is a tourist destination in Mexico frequented by cruise ships. Banju.com ($1.8k) may be Maltese for “bath”, and in that sense it brands an importer of boutique bathroom accessories; but image results are dominated by someone named Häkelkissen Banju who makes these quilted objects. Polster.com ($1.5k) is either a surname or a typo of “pollster” (someone who surveys public opinion). VeloMoto.com ($350) reads as a Spanish brand name from my perspective, since “moto” is short for “motocicleta” (motorcycle) and “velo” implies “velocidad” (velocity).

We have plenty of creative names in the list. I quite like AdAdvisors.com ($410), TruckTrade.com ($400), PurpleTree.com ($2.2k), Lastra.com ($902), Topio.com ($815), DomainEm.com ($79) as a verb plus a contraction of “them”, and Neptuna.com ($1.5k) for something oceanic. Some of those undoubtedly match preexisting brands. RecipeJournal.com ($160) makes a lot of sense for a daily cooking blog.

There are also a number of common phrases such as MissingPersons.com ($1.5k) and ComeClean.com ($1.9k). The latter normally symbolizes confession but may act as a pun, canceling that symbolism and returning the phrase to actual cleaning. CounterTerrorism.com ($5.1k) is as symptomatic of 21st-century malaise as any phrase could be. InsulinPumps.com ($3.4k) and CardProcessor.com ($1k) were the top 2 exact-match product domains. I doubt you can count the number of stores in which you’ve swiped a credit card during the past week. Just think: Anywhere you might go to spend money using a card, some business is paying for a credit card processor.

Among the cheaper good deals last week were PotMedicine.com ($69) for medicinal marijuana, VegasWager.com ($75) for gambling, MessageApps.com ($130), USPatentAttorneys.com ($269), PayPerCallAds.com ($180), and a AGoodBook.com ($133). Those are prices to curl up with!

Apparently United Airlines deemed its 2010 merger with Continental far enough in the past to let ContinentalAirlines.com ($787) go to auction uncontested. Either that or the company simply wasn’t paying attention.



© DomainNameWire.com 2015. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.