NameStarter.com :: domaining business blog // Domaining for Domainers

Archive for the ‘Domainnamewire’ Category

New TLD company Architelos sued after threatening IP Law Firm

January 23, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Architelos sent cease and desist letter to intellectual property law firm, with a predictable result.

ArchitelosWhat happens when you send a cease & desist letter alleging trademark infringement to an intellectual property law firm? You get sued.

That’s what happened after new top level domain name services company Architelos sent a C&D to California-based Cotman IP this month.

DeSantis Law Firm, which represents Architelos, sent the C&D (pdf) to Cotman IP earlier this month, claiming Cotman was infringing on its NameSentry mark.

Architelos filed for a trademark on NameSentry, a top level domain name abuse monitoring system, in October 2012. The trademark application claimed first use in April 2012 and the mark was registered in May 2013. (It originally filed an application in April 2012, but abandoned it.) Cotman alleges that Architelos’ first use of the mark on its website was actually in November 2013.

Regardless of when Architelos starting using the mark in 2012 or 2013, it’s clear that Cotman IP was using the brand NameSentry before Architelos. Cotman claims first use in November 2010, and included an Archive.org printout of its site from 2010 showing its use of the mark (pdf).

Cotman’s NameSentry service is a trademark monitoring system. There’s a bit of irony here: Cotman apparently didn’t use its own service to monitor for “NameSentry” trademark applications, nor did it it try to register the mark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Cotman IP is asking (pdf) for declaratory judgement for non-infringement of a federal trademark and cancellation of Architelos’ NameSentry trademark registration. It is also claiming false designation of origin, common law trademark infringement, unfair competition and common law unfair competition. It filed its federal lawsuit in U.S. District Court – Central District of California.

Architelos’ NameSentry product is used by the majority of currently delegated new top level domain names. It was granted a patent related to the product this week.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

SelfieSticks.com sells for $29,100 and more expired domain name sales

January 23, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Joseph Peterson runs down the latest expired domain name sales at NameJet.

If you’re as un-with-it as uncool me, then you’ll look at the $29.1k high bid for SelfieSticks.com and say, “Huh?” Apparently, selfie sticks are rods that attach to a camera phone so that you can hold it far enough away to take a picture of yourself and the grinning people next to you. Asking a stranger to snap a photo please wasn’t that onerous, was it? Trends move fast. Already the market for these devices generated a domain bidding war, while WordPress continues to identify “selfie” as a typo!

That wasn’t the only high-priced auction at NameJet during the past week; 3 other domains expired and surpassed $10k. TurkCell.net – yes, .NET – went for $10.1k, and it seems to be purely a case of brand protection / cybersquatting with reference to the 96th biggest website in Turkey (according to Alexa).

As if that’s not depressing enough, another $10.1k sale was MaxHardcore.com, which the feds seized back in 2005 as part of a child pornography case that led to jail time for the domain’s former owner (according to TheDomains.com). Apparently inbound traffic remains high a decade later, and some web masters aren’t fussy about making money from those old customers. If there’s a less cynical explanation for those bids, I’m all ears.

A third $10k sale, OPIA.com, could be for a NYC restaurant – provided it’s worth $10k for a local restaurant to drop the word “restaurant” from its .COM address … which I doubt. There’s an Optical Imaging Association at the .ORG too. But with acronyms, buyers often come out of left field.

Domain Name End $ Domain Name End $
SelfieSticks.com 29100 TurkCell.net 10100
MaxHardcore.com 10100 OPIA.com 10000
Micom.com 7200 Matinee.com 6500
GameShare.com 5201 SSNN.com 4309
Bureaux.com 4200 Mandarin
Chinese.com
4005
ACSA.com 3000 GameBit.com 2950
DaCash.com 2950 ZFitness.com 2655
WineStopper.com 2425 StudentChat.com 2322
HappyWeekend.com 2322 ENSE.com 2210
Voluntario.com 2166 Solaron.com 2157
Darwin.net 2101 SB1.com 2100
Shyne.com 2010 Renault.net 2000
Lampes.com 1655 AirCraft
Detailing.com
1409
Marketing
Survey.com
1322 Marketing
Course.com
1201
UDRY.com 1100 Artism.com 1010
GlobalLive.com 1001 Vitamin
Products.com
959
ESDI.com 850 PDHC.com 845
FDI.net 810 GeekWatch.com 806
CABP.com 800 WineCoupons.com 790
FeatureInc.com 736 Benefon.com 711
CupSize.com 709 UNDPLao.org 654
TorNet.com 625 LYBB.com 514
3669.net 510 CHMD.com 505
NewMedia
TrendWatch.com
460 BOLP.com 453
UMCH.com 451 TiempoCyber
Climate.org
430
TribunaLatina.com 425 HorseBetting
Tips.com
421
EatAtJoes.com 421 Rangler.com 415
NIWAF.org 360 VOIG.com 355
NIPC.net 338 65597.com 320
PeaceDividend
Trust.org
310 Photography-
Guide.com
298
MaineRealEstate
Broker.com
291 SCIM-IM.org 290
DiskJockeys.com 268 MintRubbing.org 260
LowRateHome
Mortgage.com
259 WebMaster
Cafe.com
250
Hadobs.org 230 17205.com 210
TomeRaider.com 199 BGone.com 195
Schulhefte.com 193 SignatureVillas.com 190
SerenityVirtual.com 190 Radio-Pais.com 190
360Z.com 189 ISGP.org 171
KBBG.com 170 WhatNoToWear.com 141
GNWR.com 129 CAPI.net 126
Sexodus.com 119 BayAreaAlliance.org 111
AussieGrill.com 109 ElegantWine.com 106
YurtWorks.com 89 HowToGetRid
OfWarts.com
80
TreeRemoval.net 80 Simpable.com 79
TopRetirement
Plan.com
79 OvumDonors.com 69

This NameJet list is longer than usual to compensate for GoDaddy’s absence. I haven’t decided yet whether to resume reporting GoDaddy sales, although I have been collecting data. The expired domain market is so active that even results from just one venue among many are too many to discuss in full.

MandarinChinese.com ($4k) is a notable item. After all, that is the world’s #1 language with nearly 3 times as many native speakers as English; and it’s the dominant language of the world’s biggest economy. Nothing to sneeze at! Bureaux.com ($4.2k) would be French for “offices”, “desks”, or perhaps “agencies”. Lampes.com ($1.7k) are French lamps. Voluntario.com ($2.2k) is Spanish and Portuguese for both the adjective “voluntary” and the noun “volunteer”.

Micom.com ($7.2k) is a typical case of multiple longer domains intersecting in a single brand name. I catalogued half a dozen such cases last week more explicitly. And it’s safe to assume that several auctions charted above are due to similar circumstances (i.e. shared brand names). Several websites ought to upgrade to ACSA.com ($3k) – for instance, the woefully cumbersome acsa-arch.org.

TorNet.com ($625) may literally be about nets. A global company doing business from the matching .IS makes trawls. The fact that a singular WineStopper.com sold for $2.4k shows how much value there is in exact-match e-commerce terms. Undervalued domains might include OvumDonors.com ($69) and DiscJockeys.com ($268).

Finally, I’m heartened to learn that somebody will now be keeping tabs on all the nefarious nerds out there with GeekWatch.com ($806)!



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Trademark Clearinghouse bundles Porn domains with service at discount

January 22, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Deal with ICM Registry cuts pricing if you sign up for TMCH and protect a brand in adult domain names.

Adult Domain NamesThe Trademark Clearinghouse (TMCH) will cut you a deal on its services, if you take a little T&A with it.

On a webinar about the new ICM Registry domains .Adult and .Porn today, ICM General Counsel Sheri Falco announced it has partnered with TMCH to create special bundled pricing. She said it’s the first deal of its kind for the Trademark Clearinghouse.

The TMCH doesn’t set pricing for domain names or what its authorized agents can charge for mark registrations, but EnCirca founder Thomas Barrett illustrated how the bundles work at his registrar.

EnCirca will provide a bundle including a one year TMCH registration along with one year sunrise registrations in both .Adult and .Porn for $348. It usually charges $249 for a one year TMCH registration, and $99/year for an .Adult or .Porn sunrise registration (or $175 for both). That means EnCirca is discounting the bundle by a little bit less than 20%.

Barrett noted that many TMCH agents charge $348 for a one year TMCH registration alone. (Do-it-yourselfers can get a lower price directly from TMCH. Since it’s not a registrar, you can’t get the discount directly from it.)

The Trademark Clearinghouse, a system for brand owners to get first dibs on their marks in new top level domain names, has seen demand well below initial projections. Perhaps this discount deal will bump its numbers a bit.

Intellectual property is quite boring, but it appears that sex sells.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

.XXX registry releases Domain Check for brand owners

January 22, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Tool checks brand across more than just ICM Registry’s top level domain names.

ICM Registry, the company behind .xxx and the forthcoming .porn and .adult domain names, has released an online tool for companies to check their brands across hundreds of new top level domain names.

Domain Check, of course, provides status information related to ICM’s own top level domain names. But it also checks the domain name across many TLDs, providing launch phase and registration status.

For example, here’s what you see when you type in ESPN.com:

icm-domaincheck

The chart shows that ESPN as a second level domain name is eligible for the .Porn and .Adult Sunrise B program. Alternatively, it will show if a domain name is eligible for the Domain Match program.

The report also shows if the domain name is available in other TLDs and if it’s eligible for Sunrise. Finally, you can see the status of other TLD launches to see if the domain can still be protected.

A lot of organizations, including universities, protected their brands in .xxx. I’m curious if they’ll do the same in .adult and .porn. After all, there are a lot more new top level domain names coming out now than when .xxx was released. Many brand owners have decided to not proactively protect their brands in each TLD.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Do we need new domain names for real estate?

January 22, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Many domain names used in real estate are still available in .com.

There are lots of new top level domain names coming out (or already released) for real estate purposes: .Realtor, .realty, .realestate, .casa, .immobilien, .immo and probably a few others I’ve missed.

This week Rightside released .forsale, a domain it is pitching for real estate purposes, i.e. 123Anystreet.forsale.

Domain names purchased for real estate marketing are big business. GoDaddy has frequently touted domain names as a key part of marketing a home for sale. This is part of the reason GoDaddy originally applied for .home and .casa.

There are a number of types of real estate domain names. There are ones registered by agents, ones registered by management companies, real estate service providers and aggregators. But the ones that probably drive the most volume are individual home websites, which have become quite popular in the past 5 or so years.

These are the types of sites that GoDaddy saw driving registrations: 123TownCircle.com, 472EasyStreet.com, 9237WinterPass.com.

Yet there’s something unique about most of these address domain names that are used for marketing real estate. That uniqueness is that they are unique. There aren’t too many people that share your same address, unless you live on a very common or numbered street name. What are the chances that a property with your same address is for sale at the same time as yours?

In other words, most domain names registered to market a property are actually available in .com.

For example, the home next to mine just went under contract. Its street address is available in .com, both with our without the “Place” at the end. Why would they register it in .forsale instead?

Another interesting factor in the success of new TLDs designed for real estate marketing is the inverse relationship between housing markets and marketing spend. In hot markets, where homes go under contract within days of being listed, real estate agents are less likely to invest in a unique domain name and website for a property. There are an awful lot of hot markets right now, at least in the United States.

This is not to say that all real estate domain names are designed for single property marketing. .Realtor can’t be used for this purpose; it’s designed for Realtor websites.

And .casa is an interesting play that could be favored over .com in Spanish speaking communities. (Not to mention that its wholesale price is just $2, so it’s a lot cheaper!)

To answer the question posed in the headline: there are lots of uses for real estate domain names. But we don’t need new TLDs for the very common use of marketing an individual property for sale.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Investment firm RVK engaged in Reverse Domain Name Hijacking on RVK.com

January 21, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Company changed its brand last year, filed UDRP to get matching three letter domain name.

RVK financial

They want the matching domain name, but would rather not pay for it.

A World Intellectual Property Organization panel has found investment advisory firm RVK (formerly R.V. Kuhns & Associates, Inc.) guilty of engaging in reverse domain name hijacking over the domain name RVK.com.

The company, aided by law firm Tonkon Torp LLP, filed a UDRP against domain name owner Gregory Ricks.

According to the decision, the initial complaint said the firm has been using the RVK mark in commerce since April 2000. After Ricks responded that he registered the domain name before that date, RVK amended its complaint with a new affidavit claiming first use in 1992. The 1992 date relied on use in letterhead, and the panel determined that the 1992 date was unfounded.

The panel noted that, even if the 1992 date were proven, there is still no evidence that the respondent was aware of the mark and that he engaged in bad-faith conduct. Ricks claims to have never received correspondence from RVK prior to the November 2014 UDRP filing.

So why did RVK wait so long to go after RVK.com? A quick look at Archive.org suggests that the firm changed its name from R.V. Kuhns & Associates, Inc. to RVK just last year.

The three person panel found RVK engaged in reverse domain name hijacking by filing the proceeding:

Complainant knew that Respondent registered the disputed domain name several months prior to Complainant’s claimed date of first use of its mark. Complainant must therefore have been aware that Respondent cannot have registered the disputed domain name in bad faith, since he cannot possibly have known of Complainant’s as-yet-nonexistent claim to the mark.

Complainant is not saved by its allegation that its trademark use began in 1992. First of all, that allegation was made only in the amended, not original, Complaint, and accordingly the original Complaint was not a good faith filing. Secondly, even if Complainant believed in good faith that its 1992 letter evidenced trademark use, it did not have a basis to believe that Respondent was aware of this letter or of any other evidence of Complainant’s alleged claim of right to the RVK mark.

Accordingly, the Panel finds that Complainant engaged in Reverse Domain Name Hijacking.

RVK.com UDRP



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

22 End User Domain Name Sales

January 21, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Recent domain buyers include TrueCar, HomeAway and a company that sells herbs for kids.

Sedo handled 603 transactions last week for a total of $1 million in domain name sales.

The top reported sale was BabyCity.com, which was sold to an herbal supplements company that sells a lot of products geared to kids. Another interesting sale is DrivenByCode.com, purchased by auto data company TrueCar.

Without further ado, here’s a list of 22 end user domain name sales that took place on Sedo last week…

(You can view previous lists like this here. If you’d like to learn how to sell your domain names like these on Sedo, download this report.)

AmericaFirst.net $7,000 – America First Credit Union in Utah, which owns the matching .com.

BabyCity.com $35,000 – The owner of TakeHerb.com, a site that sells herbal supplements — many of which are marketed for children.

Biotin.de 4,000 EUR – QUIRIS Healthcare GmbH & Co. KG, a health products company. Biotin is vitamin H.

HomeAway.ph and HomeAway.com.ph $1,250 each – vacation home rental company HomeAway.

DrivenByCode.com $1,500 – auto sales data company TrueCar.

BecauseItMatters.com $895 – a CSC Corporate Domains client.

EBI.org $3,750 – E-Business-Institut, which appears to be part of a German business incubator.

Wittgroup.com $1,500 – an online retailer in Germany that uses the web address witt-weiden.de.

Evalu.com $5,000 – The domain is registered to Evalu.com in Manchester, UK. The address is linked to multiple businesses.

IGV.com $9,900 – Purchased by Heritage Auctions, which might use it to see future auctions.

Tract.co $3,300 – Hosting company Tract, which owns the matching .com domain name.

SkillChoice.com $2,119 – Education and training company SkillSoft Corporation.

RallySales.com $1,000 – The domain name was registered by the owner of the rally car site rallye-magazin.de.

SafeAndSmart.com 999 EUR – Home security company Reliance Protectron

Eden-UK.com 1,000 GBP Eden Industries, a consumer design company that owns Eden-Industries.co.uk.

UpTourism.com 1,700 EUR – London Hotels Corporation

Geolink.org $1,000 – Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, which uses the domain name LDEO-Geoinformatics.org

FutureOfInsurance.com $3,000 – Applied Systems, which provides services to the insurance industry.

LetsDoBetter.com $3,400 – ad Agency Allen & Gerritsen

Goodeed.com $6,000 – the owner of Goodeed.me. I can’t translate their site, but the language of .com is universal.

TechNuts.com $999 – TechNut Solutions, a computer services company that owns TechNutSolutions.com.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

The wild story about how the domain name CM.com was just registered

January 21, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Verisign just allowed the reserved domain name CM.com to be registered. Here’s why.

In 2013, the longtime registrant of CM.com lost his domain name.

The domain name had been registered to Satoshi Shimoshita since 2004. Yet the domain name was deleted following a period in which the nameservers for the domain name pointed to NS1.SPAMSHUTDOWN.COM.

That a registrar forcefully deleted an extremely valuable domain name not coming up for renewal is rather odd. But the story of CM.com has become even more intriguing since then…

When Domain.com deleted CM.com in 2013, the domain name didn’t become available for registration. At the time, I reached out to Verisign to understand why no one could register it.

Verisign pointed me to Appendix 6 of the 2012 registry agreement the company signed with ICANN. Appendix 6 states that “all two-character labels must be reserved from initial (non-renewal) registration.”

So existing owners of two character domains are free to continue using them, but if one isn’t already registered, then it can’t be registered. In the case of CM.com, the deletion meant it was no longer a registered domain name and had to be held back.

Yet last Friday, the domain name was suddenly registered again. The domain name was registered by CSC Domains, a corporate domain name registrar. The whois record lists only CSC, which essentially makes it private. (Thanks Elliot and Andrea for bringing this to my attention.)

I reached out to Verisign again this week to understand how a reserved domain name was registered.

The answer: a court order. And it’s a really interesting one.

Before Satoshi Shimoshita owned CM.com, the domain name was registered to Michael Berry in San Diego. Before that, it was registered to Internet Holding Group, currently known as Branded Holding Group. And according to Branded Holding Group, the domain name was stolen from its Network Solutions account some time between 1998 and 2001. It alleges the domain name was stolen in much the same fashion as Sex.com: someone sent a fax to Network Solutions requesting a change.

Last year, more than 13 years after the alleged theft, Branded Holding Group filed suit against Network Solutions to recover the stolen domain name. (View the lawsuit PDF here.)

The case, filed by attorney Brett Lewis of Lewis & Lin, explained the long gap between the alleged theft and the suit:

The principal of [Branded Holding Group] should not have been required to pursue litigation at that time due to [Network Solutions’] negligence, and was unable to do so due to financial constraints. As a result, the Domain Name Remained registered in Berry’s name.

The suit claims that the most recent registrant, Satoshi Shimoshita, was using the domain name to send spam:

Upon information and belief, from 2002 to some time in 2013, Shimoshita used the Domain Name in connection with the sending of mass unsolicited commercial email spam.

…Upon information and belief, in or about November 2013, the Domain Name was seized by its registrar for Shimoshita’s persistent and pervasive use of the domain name in connection with the sending of bulk commercial email spam.

The domain name hasn’t been at Network Solutions for nearly a decade or more, and the company (now owned by Web.com) didn’t respond to the lawsuit. The judge entered a judgment and ordered the domain name to be handed to Branded Internet Group.

Filing a suit at least 13 years after an alleged theft raises a lot of interesting questions, especially since the suit was filed against what is now a disinterested party. The judge essentially took the undefended allegations as fact.

Branded Holding Group owns several two letter .com domain names, including rg.com, mb.com and, until recently, UF.com. It also owns a number of other valuable domain names.

It’s not clear who owns the company. The addresses for the two letter domain names all point to a New York City apartment. The address tied to its whois email address points to another New York address. It’s also not clear what type of business it is, and a search of registered New York businesses comes up null. [Update: a former address on some of the domain names links to the same address as LeaseMy.com, which is run by Roland Chemtob.]

I’m curious if there are more old domain name thefts that will come out of the woodwork now that some of the stolen domain names are worth hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Pssst…Rightside released its name collision domain names

January 20, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Many good domains on the list, but be prepared to pay a premium.

While you were partying in Las Vegas at NamesCon last week, Rightside released its name collision domain names to the public.

Sort of…

As a bit of background, name collision domain names are ones that new top level domain operators had to hold back from registration at launch. The list includes domain names that, during a somewhat random window of time in history, received traffic. ICANN required the domain names to be held back for a period of time to make sure they didn’t cause technical issues.

On January 14, Rightside pulled the block off its name collision domain names, meaning they can now be registered on a first-come, first-served basis.

I spent a bit of time this afternoon going through the collision lists for .attorney, .reviews, .pub, .dentist, .mortgage and .software to see what domains have become available. There are some great second level domains under these TLDs that were on the block list: atlanta.attorney, bankruptcy.attorney, download.software, camera.reviews, family.dentist, etc.

Yet the dozens I checked all either had premium prices or were held back by the registry for later sale.

Rightside had a data-intensive approach to determining which domains were priced at a premium. They put a lot more data and time into it than I can, and it’s unlikely they missed any true gems.

My recommendation: if you have lots of knowledge related to any of Rightside’s TLDs, or if you have your own data-intensive approach to mining domains, take a look through their name collision lists. Occasionally, you can find something good that was overlooked.

I’ve personally registered one domain name that was previously on a collision list: CDN.website.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

MomAndMe.com spared in UDRP. Should have been RDNH?

January 20, 2015Domaining, DomainnamewireComments Off

Indian company should not have brought case.

A single member World Intellectual Property Organization panel has ruled against Mahindra & Mahindra Limited of India in its UDRP against the owner of MomAndMe.com.

Even though the domain name owner didn’t respond, this case should have been a candidate for reverse domain name hijacking.

The complainant claims rights dating as far back as 2007. The domain name owner appears to have registered the domain name in 2000. Case closed.

More worrisome is how easy it is to figure out that MomAndMe.com’s owner has rights or legitimate interests in the domain name:

  • The whois reflects “Mom and Me”
  • Simply Googling the phone number in whois shows that it is a scrapbooking store in Utah. In fact, if you call the number, a friendly woman picks up the phone at the scrapbooking store.
  • Archive.org shows that the domain was previously used for a site about scrapbooking. (It no longer resolves.)

I usually don’t blame panelists for ignoring the issue of reverse domain name hijacking when the respondent doesn’t reply to a case. But in this case, I think panelist Alistair Payne should have considered it.



© DomainNameWire.com 2014. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.