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Archive for the ‘eNom’ Category

Poll: How much will 1 and 2 letter .org domains sell for?

October 12, 2012.org, Domain Sales, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, go daddy, public interest registryComments Off on Poll: How much will 1 and 2 letter .org domains sell for?

What will domains sell for at auction?

This week Public Interest Registry, the non-profit that runs .org, announced auctions for 85 one and two character .org domain names. The domains will be auctioned through Go Daddy and eNom in what the company dubs “Project94″.

Although basically anyone can bid on the domains, PIR’s pitch to ICANN to release the short domains said that bidders will have to be “committed to building out the domain name with a sound marketing and branding strategy, including a strong focus on quality, creativity and the desire to launch the site in a timely manner.”

(It’s worth noting that in all auctions I’m aware of with this sort of restriction, the rules were never strongly enforced.)

A domain industry colleague just emailed me asking how much I expect these domains to sell for. It’s a good question. I think there will be a wide range based on the character combinations.

But why not tap the wisdom of the domain crowd? Please answer the two questions below: what will the typical price be for a 1 letter .org? 2 letter .org? For the purpose of these polls, consider only one and two letter .org domains, not ones with digits in them.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll. Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.


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Demand Media’s 26 TLDs hit the armed forces, democrats, and republicans

June 13, 2012Demand Media, Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, new top level domains, United TLDComments Off on Demand Media’s 26 TLDs hit the armed forces, democrats, and republicans

Demand Media applies for 26 domain names — and some of them are very interesting.

Publicly traded Demand Media, parent company of domain registrar eNom, has applied for 26 top level domain names through (what appears to be) a subsidiary called United TLD Holdco Ltd.

The company also has a deal to share in up to 107 top level domains applied for by Donuts, Inc.

Demand Media’s list is interesting. Of course, it didn’t want to conflict with Donuts, Inc. on any applications. The only one I see close would be .fishing (Donuts has applied for .fish).

The company went after the armed forces market with .airforce, .army, and .navy. I suppose you could add .ninja to that list. Although these aren’t trademarked, it will be interesting if any governments object to these.

Here’s the full list:

ACTOR
AIRFORCE
ARMY
BAR
CAM
DANCE
DEMOCRAT
ENGINEER
FISHING
GAY
GIVES
GREEN
IMMOBILIEN
KAUFEN
MAP
MODA
MOM
MOTO
NAVY
NINJA
PUB
REHAB
REPUBLICAN
RIP
SOCIAL
WOW


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

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Related posts:

  1. Demand Media releases more details about its gTLD plans and deal with Donuts
  2. A tasty conversation with Donuts, which just applied for 307 TLDs
  3. Donuts raises $100 million, applies for 307 new TLDs

Google makes domain verification easier with eNom and Go Daddy

June 4, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, go daddy, google domain verificationComments Off on Google makes domain verification easier with eNom and Go Daddy

eNom and Go Daddy customers can verify ownership from web based interface.

Google has just introduced a speedier way to verify your domain ownership for use with certain Google tools.

You have to verify that you own a particular domain name in order to use some Google services with the domain, e.g. seeing search queries for your web site in Webmaster Tools. Until now the process has been kind of difficult for people without technical skills.

The new service allows eNom and Go Daddy customers to complete a simple sign-on process to verify to Google that they own a particular domain. To verify a domain, you basically provide your registrar login credentials within an interface and grant it permission to verify your ownership.

Google plans to extend the feature to BlueHost customers soon.


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

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Related posts:

  1. Google Adsense For Domains Now Makes Parking Easier
  2. Google Offers Domains from GoDaddy, eNom
  3. Afternic To Add Listing Verification, Feedback System

Demand Media invests $18 million in new TLDs

May 8, 2012Demand Media, dmd, Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, new tldsComments Off on Demand Media invests $18 million in new TLDs

That’s a whole lotta top level domains.

[Updated with comment from Demand Media and from investor call] Demand Media, parent company of eNom, announced today that it has invested $18 million into new top level domain names.

It’s not clear if this is for application fees only:

In April 2012, Demand Media invested $18 million in pursuit of its generic Top Level Domain (“gTLD”) initiative, which it believes represents a complementary strategic growth opportunity for its Registrar services.

Given that this refers only to the month of April, when Demand Media would have completed its applications, it’s possible that this is for application fees and related expenses only. That’s a whole lot of top level domains.

Kristen Moore, VP, Corporate Marketing & Communications at Demand Media, tells Domain Name Wire: “As the ICANN application process is not yet completed, we aren’t commenting on the specifics of any applications beyond the size of our investment and our enthusiasm for the opportunity at this time.”

On the investor conference call today, the company said it has committed $18 million in “support” of the program. It has signed two partners that will use its backend system. It also said it “may become a registry in our own right”, e.g. apply for domains itself. Its CFO said it “funded” $18 million in April, which still leads us back to application fees.

Interestingly, by the spirit of the rules, Demand Media shouldn’t be eligible to apply for new TLDs due to multiple UDRP losses. But there are plenty of technicalities to get around that.


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

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Related posts:

  1. In Demand (Part 2): How the Domain Business Can Benefit from Demand Media
  2. Demand Media Gets Into the Other Side of UDRP
  3. Demand Media Renews Ad Deal With Google

Latest New TLD Applicant Guidebook Still Disses Go Daddy, Demand Media

May 31, 2011Demand Media, dmd, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, GoDaddy, new tlds, Policy & LawComments Off on Latest New TLD Applicant Guidebook Still Disses Go Daddy, Demand Media

Companies still fall victim to anti-cybersquatting rule for new TLD applicants.

The latest (but certainly not final) version of the new top level domain name guidebook still includes a provision that, at least by the spirit of the clause, would prevent Go Daddy and Demand Media (NYSE: DMD) from applying for new top level domain names.

Section 1.2.1 of the May 20 release (large pdf) includes a laundry list of reasons why an applicant would be barred from registering a top level domain name, including if they have been “involved in of a pattern of adverse, final decisions indicating that the applicant or individual named in the application was engaged in cybersquatting.”

The guidebook defines this as three adverse decisions (including UDRP) including one in the past four years.

Both Go Daddy and Demand Media (which owns eNom) would be barred under this provision as they have multiple UDRP losses. Demand Media is clearly concerned about this provision.

That said, I still think there are loopholes that would allow these entities to apply.


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

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Related posts:

  1. Demand Media Demands Three-Strikes Rethink
  2. eNom and Go Daddy Still Disqualified from Applying for New Top Level Domains
  3. Demand Media Will Never Get Love from the Mainstream Media

Demand Media Reports Q4 Results

February 24, 2011Demand Media, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, UncategorizedComments Off on Demand Media Reports Q4 Results

Demand Media results shed light on revenue sharing, eNom results.

Earlier this week Demand Media reported fourth quarter results. The company eked out a small profit in the quarter, but expects to return to losses going forward.

You can read the complete details here, but here are some interesting numbers:

Revenue Sharing: In Q4 its network of customer web sites (which would include parked pages) generated 3.866 million billion page views with an RPM of $3.11. But the company reported that its RPM excluding traffic acquisition costs (ex-TAC) was $2.25.

The company says “Revenue ex-TAC is defined by the Company as GAAP revenue less traffic acquisition costs (TAC). TAC comprises the portion of Content & Media GAAP revenue shared with the Company’s network customers.”

So according to this definition, of the $3.11 generated per thousand page views, only $.86 was shared with publishers. This seems very low, but I’ve contacted Demand Media for an explanation and will update accordingly.

Changes in RPM: The gross RPM on customer web sites was down 22% compared to Q4 2009. The RPM on Demand Media’s owned and operated network was up 36%. Of course, a lot of Demand’s owned and operated revenue comes from actual web sites such as eHow.

eNom Growing: Registrar revenue for 2010 was $100M, up 10% compared to 2009. Including all of Demand Media’s registrars (eNom is the biggest), it had 11 million domains under management a the end of 2010. That’s up from 9.1 million at the end of 2009.


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

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Related posts:

  1. Demand Media Files to Go Public – Demand By the Numbers
  2. In Demand (Part 2): How the Domain Business Can Benefit from Demand Media
  3. Demand Media Launches Blog Distribution Network

Will You Buy Shares in Demand Media?

January 13, 2011Demand Media, Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNomComments Off on Will You Buy Shares in Demand Media?

Company sets flotation price range.

A large domain name company is getting ready to go public. Will you get in on the action?

Demand Media, which owns eNom, has set an expected price per share of $14-$16. It plans to sell 4.5 million shares while existing shareholders hope to offload 3 million shares.

The company also released preliminary, unaudited numbers for Q4 2010. In the last quarter of the year it grossed between $71.5 million and $73.5 million, a 31% increase over the same quarter in 2009. Demand Media credits the growth primarily to increased content revenue due to both more pageviews and a higher RPM. Increased domain name registrations also helped, but to a lesser extent.

So, do you plan to buy shares in Demand Media’s IPO?


© DomainNameWire.com 2010.

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Related posts:

  1. Demand Media Files to Go Public – Demand By the Numbers
  2. In Demand (Part 2): How the Domain Business Can Benefit from Demand Media
  3. Demand Media Will Never Get Love from the Mainstream Media

Afternic Premium Now Works with eNom and Moniker

December 17, 2010Afternic, Domain Sales, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, MonikerComments Off on Afternic Premium Now Works with eNom and Moniker

Afternic “turns on” its two new partners, giving domain name owners access to a powerful sales network.

Yesterday I wrote about my success with Go Daddy Premium Listings. The only downside to the service is that your domain names have to be at Go Daddy. But there’s good news for domainers who want to get similar reach for domains that are currently at Moniker and eNom — those two registrars are now active with Afternic’s Premium listing service.

What This Means

If you have your domain names at eNom/eNomCentral/BulkRegister or Moniker, you can now get them listed for sale within the registration path at four of the top 10 domain registrars. In addition to these two new registrars your domains will be listed for sale at Network Solutions, Register.com, and Name.com directly within the registration process. Customers can immediately purchase your domain name through the shopping cart and your domain will be transferred to them without any direct involvement with you.

The domains will also be listed on other registrar and partner sites but without the registration path/instant fulfillment capabilities.

How it Works

All of your interaction for listing the domain names occurs in your Afternic account. After logging in you simply add your domain names and select the “Premium” promotion level. You will also need to add a “Buy It Now” price for the domain names.

Afternic then runs some checks including ownership and content (Afternic doesn’t sell adult, gambling, and trademark domain names), after which you “opt in” the domains.

Once opted in, you won’t be able to make changes to your whois information or push the domain name to another account without first opting the domain name out. You can still list your domains for sale on other web sites, but if you sell it elsewhere you should remove the listing from Afternic.

What to Expect

A select group of large domainers have been able to use the Premium Listing level at Afternic for the past year. They’ve told me the results were remarkable. Your success will depend on a couple factors:

-How good your domain names are. They don’t need to be “premium”; they just need to be domain names that someone might want to register for their own business.

-How you price your domains. This sales channel works great with small and medium size businesses. Keep in mind the typical Afternic sale is around $1,200. I suggest pricing your domains in the $600-$2,500 range for best results. The commission is 20% (net 15% if you park the domains with Afternic) with a $120 minimum.


© DomainNameWire.com 2010.

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Related posts:

  1. Scoop: Afternic Will Change Game This Week with eNom and Moniker Partnerships
  2. Afternic Adds Name.com to List of Premium Registrars
  3. Afternic Drops Basic Listings, Offers Commission Discount for Parked Domains

Demand Media Demands Three-Strikes Rethink

December 9, 2010Demand Media, Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, new gtlds, UncategorizedComments Off on Demand Media Demands Three-Strikes Rethink

By Kevin Murphy

Demand Media has asked ICANN to reconsider an anti-cybersquatting provision in the new top-level domain Applicant Guidebook that may ban the company from running a TLD.

ICANN will do background checks on the companies applying for TLDs and their officers. If they are found to have lost three UDRP decisions in the last four years, their applications will be rejected.

Demand Media, which owns eNom, calls this “draconian”, saying that three UDRP losses can hardly be considered a “pattern” of cybersquatting when a company owns thousands of domains.

As DNW reported last month, a Demand Media subsidiary has six UDRP losses to its name just this year, although the ICANN guidebook may contain enough loopholes to let the company bid anyway.

Demand said the three-strikes rule is “an extremely broad standard that we believe will unintentionally disqualify otherwise qualified applicants”.

It went on to say that such a rule was never envisioned by the UDRP, and that some respondents may have chosen to fight complaints more fiercely had they known the full consequences.

Using UDRP decisions as an additional ex post facto punishment to disqualify an otherwise qualified applicant is an inappropriate and draconian penalty. The result is a retroactive change in the legal consequences of all UDRP decisions.

Demand Media’s position is backed up by the Internet Commerce Association, which represents big-volume domain investors.

But the rules are supported by ICANN’s intellectual property stakeholders, which have been fighting for stronger IP protections in the new TLD program for years and seem to be getting their way.


© DomainNameWire.com 2010.

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Related posts:

  1. In Demand (Part 2): How the Domain Business Can Benefit from Demand Media
  2. Demand Media Buys Demand.com
  3. Demand Media to ICANN: Hurry Up

Zuccarini Case Against NameJet, NetSol, et al Moved to Virginia

November 23, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, eNom, NameJet, Network Solutions, Policy & Law, VeriSignComments Off on Zuccarini Case Against NameJet, NetSol, et al Moved to Virginia

Court transfers lawsuit to Virginia.

In a move that may have been expected by some observers, John Zuccarini’s lawsuit against NameJet, Network Solutions, eNom, and VeriSign has been transferred to the Eastern District of Virginia.

The case stems from some of John Zuccarini’s domain names that were transferred to a receiver after a cybersquatting judgment against him. The receiver let some of the domain names expire and they were subsequently auctioned off on NameJet.

eNom and Network Solutions asked the court to dismiss the case based on improper jurisdiction. Zuccarini had agreed to contracts with “forum selection clauses” when he registered the domain names. The court determined that the case should not be dismissed outright as the defendants wished, but instead should be transferred to the Eastern District of Virginia (pdf).

This move was not entirely unexpected. When the case was filed, domain name attorney John Berryhill (who is not involved in the case) commented on Domain Name Wire: “Venue Fail. He is in the District of Southern Florida alleging breach of contract, when the contract specifies that disputes are to be brought in Virginia.”


© DomainNameWire.com 2010.

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Related posts:

  1. Zuccarini Sues NameJet, eNom, VeriSign, and Network Solutions
  2. Court Denies Emergency Injunction for Zuccarini Domains Sold at NameJet
  3. Zuccarini Responds in Domain Case, Says Assignee is Lying