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4 new TLD applications withdrawn

September 5, 2012.ksb, Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, new tlds, new top level domains, UncategorizedComments Off on 4 new TLD applications withdrawn

Google and one .brand applicant withdraw applications.

Kudos to Michele Neylon for spotting an option on ICANN’s web site to see which new top level domain name applications have been withdrawn.

Thus far four applications have been withdrawn, including three by Google.

The three by Google should not come as a huge surprise. ICANN Senior VP Kurt Pritz previously announced that three application had been withdrawn, and you can thank Kevin Murphy for that. Murphy earlier reported that three Google applications wouldn’t be accepted, and later surmised that Google accounted for the three applications Pritz referred to. (Something tells me Google won’t send a check to Murphy for his assistance.)

Google withdrew applications for .and, .are, and .est, all of which are protected three-letter country codes.

The fourth withdrawn application is a brand application for .ksb by KSB Aktiengesellschaft. Frankly, I don’t see any reason that the company needs the .ksb top level domain. It already owns KSB.com.

I reached out to KSB’s consultant on its application, which declined to comment.


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Yep, Google bought G.me and it now forwards to Google+

July 27, 2012Domain Sales, Domaining, Domainnamewire, g.me, googleComments Off on Yep, Google bought G.me and it now forwards to Google+

Google adds another one letter domain name to its collection.

In May I wrote about how Google may have purchased the domain name G.me. The domain name was registered to Mark Monitor’s DNStinations, which often times registers domain names on behalf of the company.

Now it’s official: Google was the buyer.

The nameservers for the domain also point to Google.com now. Type g.me in your browser and you’ll be forwarded to the plus.google.com.

The domain name was previously a registry reserved domain name, which means Google probably bought it directly from the .me registry.

Google has acquired a number of other “g dot” domains, including g.co. Google uses g.co as a URL shortener.


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Guy files cybersquatting complaint against a page on Blogger

June 15, 2012anticybersquatting act, blogger, Cybersquatting, Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, Policy & LawComments Off on Guy files cybersquatting complaint against a page on Blogger

Apparently blogger.com followed by a bunch of numbers infringes this guy’s trademarks.

From the WTF category…

Nevada resident Steven Barket has filed a federal lawsuit against Google and a John Doe, claiming violations of the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act and Lanham Act.

The offending domain name that violates Barket’s trademarks?

blogger.com/profile/10034500688963114971

Yes, that’s a single page on the Blogger.com domain.

Barket demands a judgement ordering the transfer of the “domain”.

You’ll notice that the URL he’s claiming as cybersquatting doesn’t even include his name. I think what he’s really upset about is stevebarket.blogspot.com, which seems to be a blog saying bad things about Barket. It includes a few links to an inactive WordPress.com blog. But even that is a subdirectory of a domain, not a domain itself.

I can understand Barket wanting Google to remove the page, but I think his legal approach is misinformed.


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Google and Amazon compete on 21 new top level domain applications

June 13, 2012amazon, Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, new top level domains, UncategorizedComments Off on Google and Amazon compete on 21 new top level domain applications

Google and Amazon had a lot of the same ideas for new top level domains.

One of the biggest battles over new top level domains will pit internet heavyweights Google and Amazon against each other.

Amazon applied for 76 top level domains and Google applied for 101 top level domains. But I count 20 — and perhaps 21 — domain names that the two will have to duke it out for.

Here’s the list of domains that both companies applied for:

.App
.Book
.Cloud
.Dev
.Drive
.Free
.Game
.Kid/.Kids
.Mail
.Map
.Movie
.Music
.Play
.Search
.Shop
.Show
.Spot
.Store
.Talk
.Wow
.You

And although it’s not as similar to .kid and .kids, Amazon applied for .news and Google applied for .new. (It seems like it should be the other way around, shouldn’t it?)

Many of these are also contested by other applicants. .App has 13 applications, for example.

For some domains it’s possible these two will whittle it down to just themselves and then do horse trading — i.e. you take .search I’ll take .shop.

Or we could see some very expensive auctions…

[Updated to add .dev, which I missed the first time around.]


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Amazon, Google, and Symantec to fight for .cloud domain name

June 13, 2012.cloud, amazon.com, Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, symantec, top level domains, UncategorizedComments Off on Amazon, Google, and Symantec to fight for .cloud domain name

Seven applicants to compete for .cloud top level domain include some really big internet giants.

Seven applicants filed requests with ICANN for the .cloud top level domain name — and three of them are heavyweight contenders.

Amazon.com, Google, and Symantec Corporation are all in the running for the domain name. They’ll be competing against some smaller competitors including Aruba.it, CloudNames.com, Donuts.co, and Top Level Domain Holdings.

If the seven can’t work out a deal as to who will run the domain then the domain will proceed to an auction. With such big pocketed companies going after this one, it could easily go for millions of dollars.

The bigger question: if it’s worth millions of dollars.


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Google applies for 101 top level domains

June 13, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, new tlds, UncategorizedComments Off on Google applies for 101 top level domains

Google looks like the largest player amongst internet brands on new top level domain names.

I count 101 total applications. The company applied for the domains under a unique name — Charleston Road Registry Inc.

Only three of the names are internationalized domain names. Here’s the full list:

ADS
AND
ANDROID
APP
ARE
BABY
BLOG
BOO
BOOK
BUY
CAL
CAR
CHANNEL
CHROME
CLOUD
CORP
CPA
DAD
DAY
DCLK
DDS
DEV
DIY
DOCS
DOG
DOT
DRIVE
EARTH
EAT
ESQ
EST
FAMILY
FILM
FLY
FOO
FREE
FUN
FYI
GAME
GBIZ
GLE
GMAIL
GMBH
GOO
GOOG
GOOGLE
GUGE
HANGOUT
HERE
HOME
HOW
INC
ING
KID
LIVE
LLC
LLP
LOL
LOVE
MAIL
MAP
MBA
MED
MEME
MOM
MOTO
MOV
MOVIE
MUSIC
NEW
NEXUS
PAGE
PET
PHD
PLAY
PLUS
PROD
PROF
RSVP
SEARCH
SHOP
SHOW
SITE
SOY
SPOT
SRL
STORE
TALK
TEAM
TECH
TOUR
TUBE
VIP
WEB
WOW
YOU
YOUTUBE
ZIP

IDNs:
a-code, translation, script

xn--flw351e Chinese for “Google” Hani
xn--q9jyb4c Japanese for “everyone” Jpan
xn--qcka1pmc Google Jpan


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DNW’s new TLD roundup: the good, the bad and the funny

June 1, 2012.sucks, association national advertisers, Domaining, Domainnamewire, facebook, google, momentous, new tlds, radix, tldh, Uncategorized, zipposComments Off on DNW’s new TLD roundup: the good, the bad and the funny

From brands to portfolio players, here’s a look at what we know so far.

The “big reveal” of who applied for what top level domains isn’t until June 13. But that didn’t stop a lot of companies from making their own announcements over the 36 hours since the application window closed.

Here’s my roundup and analysis:

Google

Google announced four domains it is applying for, but AdAge reports the company is applying for upwards of 50 domain names.

The announcement came from Vint Cerf, Google’s “Chief Internet Evangelist”. He also happens to be the former Chairman of ICANN’s board. One thought is if Cerf is trying to throw ICANN a bone here. Not in the form of money, because we all know ICANN’s coffers are going to be a lot fuller than we expected just months ago. It’s more of a “we believe in ICANN and what they’re doing” statement. Still, I think Google could have done this by applying for perhaps a dozen domains including some non-.brand domains. So this seems like a bit more. It seems like Google sees benefits to new top level domains.

But I gotta ask: .lol? Really?

Facebook

Is Facebook applying for .facebook or anything else?

A Facebook spokesperson told AdAge a couple months ago that it wasn’t applying. But it’s hard for a spokesperson to answer a negative like that. A TLD initiative could come from anywhere within the company.

And a lot has happened since two months ago.

I reached out to Facebook yesterday to ask again if they applied for any new TLDs. All they would say is “no comment”.

I’d be willing to bet money (or rapidly devaluing FB shares) that Facebook applied for something.

TLDH and Directi

Two of the big “portfolio” applicants have announced their applications.

Top Level Domain Holdings, which owns Minds + Machines, applied for 92 domains, 68 of which are on its own behalf. (Others are with partners or on behalf of clients.)

It’s not very surprising to me that the company applied for .green. It has an entity set up to apply for .eco, but that one could be messy. This will be a battle to watch.

The company also applied for two IDN top level domains.

TLDH applied for a lot of common strings that will be in contention.

The same can be said for Directi’s new Radix company (see disclosure). The company applied for 31 strings. Company founder Bhavin Turakhia told DomainIncite he expects every one of the names to be in contention with other applicants.

GoDaddy

One of the companies both TLDH and Radix will have to face off with is Go Daddy. I broke the news Wednesday night of the company’s applications for .home and .casa. Not surprisingly, .home has multiple applicants. Slightly surprisingly, so does .casa. It will be interesting to see how these play out.

The brand scare continues

The notion that brands must apply for their .brand to keep others from doing so certainly played a role in applications. You can blame Association of National Advertisers in part for this. But I’ve got to wonder what consultant convinced lighter maker Zippo that it needed to apply for .zippo.

Here’s a quote from an article in The Economist:

Jeff Duke, general counsel at Zippo, a lighter-maker, says the firm already spends $3m a year “playing whack-a-mole” with claim-jumpers—a tidy sum for a small manufacturer, albeit one with a big brand. The expansion will “multiply our headaches”, he predicts. Zippo will apply for .zippo, even though “we don’t have any great plans for it.”

This is a prime example of a domain that didn’t need to be applied for on a defensive basis.

.Sucks

This one, courtesy of a Momentous (Pool.com) subsidiary, is sure to be a punching bag. Regardless of the true intent, the company will be hard pressed to convince anyone that it’s not merely a stick up to get brands to protect themselves.

Momentous figures to profit from new TLDs from others in the coming years. It’s offering a digital archery service. It’s also sure to have a lot of clients for sunrise auctions.

Things are getting interesting…

Disclosure: I work with Directi’s media companies. I have not been involved with Radix.


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Google announces top level domain applications including .lol, .docs

May 31, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, new top level domains, UncategorizedComments Off on Google announces top level domain applications including .lol, .docs

Vint Cerf releases some details about company’s new TLD strategy.

Google today announced limited details about some of its top level domain applications.

The announcement fittingly came from former ICANN Chairman and current Google Chief Internet Evangelist Vint Cerf.

Cerf said the TLDs the company applied for fall into four categories:

1. Trademarks, e.g. .google

2. Domains related to core businesses, e.g. .docs

3. Domains “that will improve user experience, e.g. .youtube (I’m not sure why that doesn’t match trademarks as well)

4. Other general domains, e.g. .lol

Cerf also reiterated that Google wants “to make the introduction of new generic TLDs a good experience for web users and site owners”, but in a different context than the search engine. The context was as a registry, including providing rights protection mechanisms.

I wonder if .search is one of the “core business” domains for which it applied?

I reached out to Google for comment on additional domains. Unsurprisingly, they said they aren’t commenting further at this time. But AdAge reports the company applied for over 50 TLDs.


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Did Google just buy G.me?

May 19, 2012dnstinations, Domain Sales, Domaining, Domainnamewire, g.me, google, mark monitorComments Off on Did Google just buy G.me?

G.me now registered to brand protection company.

The whois record for the domain name G.me recently changed to DNStination Inc., which is the proxy service for brand protection company Mark Monitor:

The change was just triggered on DomainTools yesterday, although the record shows it was altered on April 20.

The domain name was previously a registry reserved domain name.

Although nothing is definitive, there’s a good possibility that Google is the new owner. Google uses Mark Monitor for some of its domain name registrations. Given Mark Monitor’s need to avoid conflict of interest amongst clients, at a minimum I’d assume that Google was aware of any transaction for G.me.

There’s also a Google Chrome extension called G+Me.


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Google wants to patent making online ads social

May 10, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, facebook, google, online ads, patents, Policy & LawComments Off on Google wants to patent making online ads social

Company files two patent applications for making online ads social.

Google has filed two patent applications related to social interactions with online advertisements.

The applications, 20120116871 and 20120116867 (pdf), were filed in November and just published today. Both are titled “Social Overlays On Ads”.

The patent applications describe systems in which social overlays are placed on ads. For example, an ad my show how many people in your particular Google+ circles like an ad. It could also integrate into Google’s +1 system. If you +1′d an ad, members of your Google+ circles would then see that you like the ad. Viewers could also republish an ad to their social network, similar to how you can share a photo on Facebook now.

In the example below, the ad has a social overlay that says how many people in the user’s location +1′d the ad.

This idea sounds familiar to me. Let’s see, where have I seen something like this already…


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