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Oversee.net Pays $1,500 To Filer of SnapNames Class Action Lawsuit

August 26, 2011Domaining, Domainnamewire, Expired Domains, halvarez, SnapNamesComments Off on Oversee.net Pays $1,500 To Filer of SnapNames Class Action Lawsuit

Class representative gets a small check.

Oversee.net has paid $1,500 to Stewart Resmer, the “class representative” for a lawsuit filed against Oversee.net in the wake of the halvarez shill bidding scandal.

Resmer originally filed suit against Oversee in U.S. District Court Central District of California. But the judge tossed the case out because the amount of money concerned was under $5 million.

As a result, Resmer’s lawyers refiled in The Superior Court of Los Angeles County. Oversee.net settled the case, agreeing to adopt a new shill bidding policy. The company also agreed to pay people that had overpaid as a result of the shill bidding, although it had already made that offer to customers ahead of the lawsuit.

Resmer, as class representative, got a check for $1,500. Resmer also said two non-profits may receive money as part of the settlement, including Internet Commerce Association.


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Related posts:

  1. SnapNames Class Action Lawsuit Dismissed
  2. Second Class Action Lawsuit Filed Against Oversee.net and SnapNames
  3. Lawyer: SnapNames Class Action Headed to State Court

Nelson Brady Will Speak, But What Will He Say?

May 6, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, halvarez, nelson brady, Oversee.net, Policy & Law, SnapNamesComments Off on Nelson Brady Will Speak, But What Will He Say?

Expect to hear his side of the story within 30 days.

By filing suit against former employee Nelson Brady this week, Oversee.net and Snapnames hope to accomplish a couple things. Yes, it wants to get some of its money back. But more importantly, it wants to clear its name.

Ever since the scandal broke last year, conspiracy theorists have suggested that the company was complicit in what happened and that’s why it wasn’t going after Brady. In reality, it was trying to settle with Brady outside of court before filing a lawsuit. By filing the suit, the company must think that it is “clean”, and there’s only one person who orchestrated the bidding scheme.

I talked to Nelson Brady’s defense lawyer yesterday and he informed me that Brady will be filing a “complete” response within 30 days. That Brady didn’t settle out of court to make this problem go away suggests that he doesn’t feel completely responsible for what happened. It’s unclear what he could argue, but I go back to a conversation I had with him shortly after the scandal broke. He informed me that he acted alone, but there was more to the story.

For obvious reasons, Brady and his lawyer don’t want to discuss the rest of the story publicly right now. But the only thing that pops to mind is that perhaps someone else knew about what was happening and didn’t tell anyone. Clearly, Oversee would not be aware that someone else knew when it filed this lawsuit. And, to be clear, I have no insight into what “more to the story” means.

But I don’t expect the typical flat-out denial from Brady in his response. I suspect he’ll have something more to say.


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Related posts:

  1. SnapNames and Oversee.net Sue Nelson Brady aka Halvarez
  2. Nelson Brady on SnapNames Scandal
  3. Inside Oversee.net v. Howard Nelson Brady, Jr.

SnapNames Class Action Lawsuit Dismissed

February 27, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, halvarez, Oversee.net, Policy & Law, SnapNamesComments Off on SnapNames Class Action Lawsuit Dismissed

Lawsuit over employee bidding scandal voluntarily dismissed by plaintiff.

A lawsuit against Snapnames and parent company Oversee.net that was requesting class action status has been voluntarily dismissed.

Steward Resmer, a SnapNames customer who lost $20 in an auction thanks to the “halvarez scandal”, filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court, Central District of California in November. Resmer was seeking class action status for the case on behalf of U.S. customers who had lost money due to inflated bidding. He was asking for Snapames to “Disgorge Defendants of all revenue earned from SnapNames.com Internet domain name auctions during the Class period”.

The lawsuit hit a major roadblock when the judge questioned the dollar amount in question in the suit. In order to be certified as a class action, at least $5 million in damages must have occurred. As it turned out, U.S. customers lost less than $1 million in direct over bids thanks to the employee bidding.

Resmer dismissed the case without prejudice, meaning it can be refiled at a later date. A copy of the dismissal is here.


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Related posts:

  1. Judge Says SnapNames Lawsuit Might be Too Small for Class Action
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  3. Oversee.net Asks Court to Dismiss SnapNames Lawsuit

Answers to 3 Questions about the SnapNames Bidding Scandal

February 2, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, Expired Domains, halvarez, SnapNamesComments Off on Answers to 3 Questions about the SnapNames Bidding Scandal

Answers to three commonly asked questions about the ‘halvarez’ scandal.

The topic commonly known as ‘halvarez’ — the insider bidding scandal at Snapnames — wasn’t a major topic at DOMAINfest. I didn’t expect it to be, either. Within days of the scandal breaking I talked to several big SnapNames customers. They were disappointed about what happened, but also understanding. Most had accepted SnapNames’ compensation offer and moved on.

But a number of people still have questions. So I took advantage of a media breakfast with Oversee.net CEO Jeff Kupietzky last week to get some answers to some of these commonly asked questions.

If ‘halvarez’ did what Oversee.net alleges, why hasn’t a lawsuit been filed against him?

This is the questions I hear most frequently. Kupietzky described it as an “ongoing legal matter”. This makes sense. Contrary to what some people believe, the first reaction when someone allegedly does something wrong isn’t to file a lawsuit. There are other ways to get restitution or compensation.

Has it always been against SnapNames’ policy for employees to bid on auctions?

The exact date that employees were notified they may not bid in auctions isn’t known. However, the employee’s alleged behavior of bidding to increase customer’s costs has clearly been against the rules and norms.

How much compensation has been paid out to customers?

SnapNames isn’t releasing the actual dollar amount. But of the compensation pool it set aside, about 55% has been claimed.

My personal knowledge from talking to some of SnapNames’ biggest customers is that most customers weren’t owed nearly as much as you might read about on some forums and blogs. Some of the biggest customers were owed low-to-mid five figure sums. This depends, of course, on what types of domains they were bidding on. But as I mentioned before, most big customers I’ve talked to took the compensation offer and continue to bid at SnapNames. (Hat tip to Kieren McCarthy for asking the last question.)


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Related posts:

  1. In SnapNames Scandal, Conspiracy Theorists Were (Sort of) Right
  2. Poll: How SnapNames Scandal Affects You
  3. Nelson Brady on SnapNames Scandal