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Archive for the ‘patents’ Category

Verisign files patent application for way of transfering hosting on DNSSEC Domains

October 5, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, patents, Uncategorized, VeriSignComments Off on Verisign files patent application for way of transfering hosting on DNSSEC Domains

Application describes way to change hosting on DNSSEC enabled domains without any downtime.

Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) bring all sorts of security benefits, but it can make changing hosting providers more challenging.

Verisign has filed a patent for systems and methods for making the process of changing web hosts on a DNSSEC-enabled domain easier (pdf).

Here’s the challenge, as the company describes in its application named “Transfer of DNSSEC Domains”:

With the introduction of DNSSEC into vast registries, such as the .com and .net registries, DNS hosting transfer of a DNSSEC enabled domain brings with it the potential for resolution problems. Such problems may result in domains not resolving securely, or not resolving at all, which can have significant detrimental effects on e-commerce and other high-traffic sites. For DNSSEC, enabled domains, in addition to managing the switchover of nameservers, the change in registrars and/or hosts involves managing the Delegation Signer (DS) resource records in the parent zone and the list of DNSKEY records across the old and new child zones to ensure that the DNSSEC chain will continuously validate during the transfer.

And here’s the gist of what Verisign wants to patent:

Systems and methods of transferring a DNSSEC enabled domain from a losing hosting provider to a gaining hosting provider are described in which the transfer of the domain may be achieved without disruption to a DNSSEC validation of the domain. Systems and methods, such as those directed to registry and/or registrar servers, may include transferring a DNSKEY or Delegation Signer (DS) record from a gaining hosting provider to a losing hosting provider prior to transferring the domain from the losing hosting provider to the gaining hosting provider. A gaining hosting provider may sign DNS records of the domain with the gaining hosting provider DNSKEY prior to transferring the domain from the losing hosting provider to the gaining hosting provider. Additionally, a registry server, or similar device, may be configured to act as an intermediary between the losing hosting provider and the gaining hosting provider during the transfer process.

The application was filed April 1, 2011 and just published yesterday.


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Verisign wants patent on “non-existent domain” analysis tools

October 4, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, Expired Domains, nxd data, patents, VeriSign, verisign nxdComments Off on Verisign wants patent on “non-existent domain” analysis tools

Company files patent application related to NXD data analysis.

Verisign has made great strides in opening up its treasure trove of data related to traffic to non-existent domain names (NXD).

Now it wants to patent some of its methods.

The company filed a patent application (pdf) for “Traffic Like NXDomains” in March last year. The application was just published today.

The application explains how its NXD tools benefit domainers:

Maintaining and interpreting records related to user requests for domains can be valuable for several reasons. For example, companies and individuals known as “domainers” regularly buy and sell domain names to earn a profit. These domainers generate income through domain parking and/or website development, as well as domain reselling, but typically rely on revenue generated from advertising click-through traffic. Thus, domainers desire NXDs exhibiting high Internet traffic in order to buy and register those NXDs.

Using current systems, domainers must blindly request and then review information regarding DNS requests associated with a set of NXDs in order to identify the high-traffic NXDs. After reviewing the requested information, the domainer will purchase a subset of the NXDs considered high-traffic and establish a web site for each of these domain names. Once the domainer has purchased a domain name and establishes a monetization mechanism, such as a website, they are able to collect and analyze additional information related to the site’s positive traffic, such as unique visits, click-traffic, and other indicators of site performance. Using this information regarding a site’s positive traffic, the domainer can better identify valuable domain names and generate revenue from them by, for instance, placing advertisements on such sites.

Currently, however, no system exists that enables domainers to capitalize on the collected positive traffic information to find additional NXDs of value. Instead, domainers must repeat the process of blindly requesting and reviewing NXD information, purchasing a subset of the NXDs, establishing sites for the associated domain names, and observing the positive traffic for these new sites. Thus, domainers are currently unable to leverage the discovery of a valuable domain name to find additional NXDs expected to exhibit similar traffic patterns. Therefore, a need exists for a tool able to suggest NXDs with DNS traffic similar to an identified domain name.

The patent application then describes numerous ways of analyzing NXD data.


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Go Daddy patents “announcing a domain name registration on a social website”

September 25, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, patents, social networking patentComments Off on Go Daddy patents “announcing a domain name registration on a social website”

Patent describes way to announce your latest domain name registration.

Last year I wrote about Go Daddy’s patent applications related to announcing a domain name registration on a social network.

Today the United States Patent and Trademark office granted the domain name registrar a patent for “announcing a domain name registration on a social website”.

U.S. patent number 8,276,057 (pdf) describes a way in which a domain name registrar account could be connected to a social network such as Facebook. After a user registered domain name, the user could set a delay period before which an announcement about the registration would be made on the social network. The system could also track traffic driven by the social network posting.

The patent says the purpose of this announcement could be to drive traffic to a newly created web site or even a parked page. (Of course, driving traffic by this way to a parked page would be frowned upon by domain parking companies.)


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Google wants to patent making online ads social

May 10, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, facebook, google, online ads, patents, Policy & LawComments Off on Google wants to patent making online ads social

Company files two patent applications for making online ads social.

Google has filed two patent applications related to social interactions with online advertisements.

The applications, 20120116871 and 20120116867 (pdf), were filed in November and just published today. Both are titled “Social Overlays On Ads”.

The patent applications describe systems in which social overlays are placed on ads. For example, an ad my show how many people in your particular Google+ circles like an ad. It could also integrate into Google’s +1 system. If you +1′d an ad, members of your Google+ circles would then see that you like the ad. Viewers could also republish an ad to their social network, similar to how you can share a photo on Facebook now.

In the example below, the ad has a social overlay that says how many people in the user’s location +1′d the ad.

This idea sounds familiar to me. Let’s see, where have I seen something like this already…


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Google wants to patent related links functionality

May 5, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, patents, Policy & Law, related links, yarppComments Off on Google wants to patent related links functionality

Lookout, YARPP.

Are you a blogger that uses Yet Another Related Posts Plugin (YARPP)? There are a lot of similar plugins (hence the funny name).

But Google apparently thinks it’s novel, as the company has filed a patent application (pdf) for precisely this.

United States patent application 20120109932, titled “Related Links”, covers the process of identifying keywords within an article and then displaying related articles (or searches) based on those keywords.

In other words, it looks a lot link the “Further Reading” links at the bottom of this article.

Here’s how the inventors describe the problem they’re trying to solve:

Regardless of whether the web is static or dynamic there are cases where website owners want to display on their web pages links to other web pages within the same web domain or one or more other domains whose contents are related to the current web page, for example, to increase the page views on these web sites or pages. A conventional technique for presenting web page links is for a user (e.g., a web site owner or developer) to manually identify related web pages and then embed links to these web pages on one or more web pages of the user’s web site. The user can identify related web pages by conducting searches within the same web domain or one or more other domains based on the contents in the web pages, for example, by manually selecting some keywords from the contents on his web pages as most representative of the contents. These keywords are used as a search query to a search engine. The user can then manually select from the obtained search results. However, If the web site has a large number of web pages, and the textual contents in each web page is different from one another, it can be inconvenient for a web site owner to manually search for such related web pages and embed the links to them in the web pages during creation and setting up of the web site.

On the other hand, for some conventional web pages, especially for some dynamically created web pages, the contents on the web page may change when visited at different times. This can be due to changes to the text data during the time interval between different visits. In this case, it is difficult for the web site owner to predict what kind of content will be presented on the web page to the user in the future, hence it will be difficult for the user to find the web pages that can be considered related to the web page and embed them in the page.


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Google wants to patent related links functionality

May 5, 2012Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, patents, Policy & Law, related links, yarppComments Off on Google wants to patent related links functionality

Lookout, YARPP.

Are you a blogger that uses Yet Another Related Posts Plugin (YARPP)? There are a lot of similar plugins (hence the funny name).

But Google apparently thinks it’s novel, as the company has filed a patent application (pdf) for precisely this.

United States patent application 20120109932, titled “Related Links”, covers the process of identifying keywords within an article and then displaying related articles (or searches) based on those keywords.

In other words, it looks a lot link the “Further Reading” links at the bottom of this article.

Here’s how the inventors describe the problem they’re trying to solve:

Regardless of whether the web is static or dynamic there are cases where website owners want to display on their web pages links to other web pages within the same web domain or one or more other domains whose contents are related to the current web page, for example, to increase the page views on these web sites or pages. A conventional technique for presenting web page links is for a user (e.g., a web site owner or developer) to manually identify related web pages and then embed links to these web pages on one or more web pages of the user’s web site. The user can identify related web pages by conducting searches within the same web domain or one or more other domains based on the contents in the web pages, for example, by manually selecting some keywords from the contents on his web pages as most representative of the contents. These keywords are used as a search query to a search engine. The user can then manually select from the obtained search results. However, If the web site has a large number of web pages, and the textual contents in each web page is different from one another, it can be inconvenient for a web site owner to manually search for such related web pages and embed the links to them in the web pages during creation and setting up of the web site.

On the other hand, for some conventional web pages, especially for some dynamically created web pages, the contents on the web page may change when visited at different times. This can be due to changes to the text data during the time interval between different visits. In this case, it is difficult for the web site owner to predict what kind of content will be presented on the web page to the user in the future, hence it will be difficult for the user to find the web pages that can be considered related to the web page and embed them in the page.


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Go Daddy Wants to Patent Way to Monetize URL Shorteners

October 13, 2011Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, GoDaddy, patentsComments Off on Go Daddy Wants to Patent Way to Monetize URL Shorteners

A way to make money off of shortened URLs?

There’s not a whole lot of money in shortening links. Go Daddy has devised a way to change that.

The company filed a trio of patent applications (here’s one) for methods of monetizing shortened URLs. The applications were filed in April 2010 and just published today.

The idea is to monetize each visitor to a shortened URL with some sort of advertising. The method parses the URL that was shortened to come up with relevant keywords and then serve ads related to that. Ads could be served in a number of ways, such as a contextually relevant pop-up that is delivered alongside the target URL when someone clicks on the shortened URL.

I’m not sure if this is what’s intended, but this might also be a good way to monetize a URL shortening interface, such as GoDaddy‘s x.co: after someone enters the URL they want to shorten you could show targeted ads to them next to the shortened URL.

James Bladel, Director of Policy Planning at GoDaddy.com, is listed as the inventor.


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Go Daddy Wants Patents for Announcing Domain Registrations on Facebook

March 22, 2011Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, facebook, GoDaddy, patentsComments Off on Go Daddy Wants Patents for Announcing Domain Registrations on Facebook

Domain name registrar files two patent applications for promoting newly registered domain names.

The Go Daddy Group, parent company of domain name registrar GoDaddy, has filed a pair of patent applications related to announcing a new domain registration on social networking sites such as Facebook.

The patent applications are 12/561408 for “Social Website Domain Registration Announcement” and 12/561439 for “Social Website Domain Registration Search Engine Feed”.

The basic idea is that customers who register a domain name can announce the registration on social networking sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn. The customer would allow the registration to be published after a set period of time (perhaps giving the registrant time to get a web site up at the address). When it is published on the social network the traffic from the link would be tracked and the domain name registrar might suggest another product to boost traffic.

The registration announcements could be posted to a Go Daddy page and/or the customers page on a social networking site.

Interestingly, the patent application suggests that one use of this would be to drive visitors to a parked domain name:

If a domain name registrant chooses an option on the control panel to immediately generate traffic, via the published link, for the parked domain page (illustrated in FIG. 4 and described in detail below), a metric, such as a pay-per-click model or click-through traffic based on 301 redirects, described below, or any other metric for measuring additional traffic may be monitored to gauge the success of the parked domain page. A registrant may have the option of keeping the domain a parked domain page to generate traffic and revenue, or may keep the domain a parked page only prior to completion of the final hosted website.

I suspect Google would frown upon that.


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VeriSign Gets Patent Related to Internationalized Domain Names

August 10, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, patents, Policy & Law, VeriSignComments Off on VeriSign Gets Patent Related to Internationalized Domain Names

Patent is for method of registering and using IDNs.

verisign idnThe U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted U.S. patent number 7,774,432 to VeriSign for
Registering and using multilingual domain names. The patent application was a continuation of a 2001 application that was abandoned, and a provisional application from 2000. This particular application was filed in 2007.

The abstract for the patent sums it up:

A method, system, and computer-readable medium are described for registering and using multilingual domain names that include characters outside the ASCII character subset supported by the DNS system. Such multilingual domain names can in some situations be registered by first being converted into appropriate ASCII-Compatible Encodings (ACEs) that represent the corresponding multilingual domain names and that use only characters within the ASCII character subset. In addition, a variety of binary variants may be generated at registration for each multilingual domain name and then used as equivalents for the multilingual domain name, such as by storing the variants in the registry as alternative domain names or by otherwise reserving the binary variants. When requests to resolve such a registered multilingual domain name into a corresponding IP address or URL are received, the stored binary variants and/or ACE information can then be used to respond in an appropriate manner.

You can view the patent here (pdf).


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GoDaddy Files Patent App for “Jointly Auctioning Expiring Domain Names”

April 29, 2010Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, GoDaddy, patentsComments Off on GoDaddy Files Patent App for “Jointly Auctioning Expiring Domain Names”

Registrar files patent applications related to helping owners of expired domains sell them.

Domain name registrar Go Daddy has filed two patents describing a system for jointly selling an expiring domain name in conjunction with the current owner of the domain name.

United States Patent publications 2010/0106650 and 2010/0106616 describe a system whereby a deal is struck between the owners of expiring domain names and a domain seller to sell the domain names and share the profits.

The basics of the invention are:

1. Pull a list of domains expiring within a predetermined timeframe
2. Contact the owners of these expiring domains, offering to help the owners sell the domains
3. Getting the owner to agree via some mechanism (e.g. email, click-through agreement on web site)
4. Sell the domain (e.g. on GoDaddy Auctions) and share the proceeds

The two patent applications were filed on October 29, 2008 and just published today. They list Go Daddy President & COO Warren Adelman and Vice President of Corporate Development & Policy Tim Ruiz as inventors.

Application PDFs:

US20100106616
US20100106650


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