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Archive for the ‘SEO’ Category

Go Daddy gets patent for SEO and search engine submission

September 18, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, go daddy, godaddy.com, search engine optimization, SEOComments Off on Go Daddy gets patent for SEO and search engine submission

Patent covers method and systems for SEO suggestions and search engine submission.

The United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued a patent (pdf) to Go Daddy for “method for improving a web site’s ranking with search engines”.

U.S. patent number 8,271,488 describes a system for helping web site owners edit their web pages for better search results and then automatically submitting the sites to multiple search engines.

If some of this seems outdated, that’s because the patent application was filed in 2003.

The images in the patent show Go Daddy’s former search engine product called Traffic Blazer. The company now offers a product called search engine visibility that has similar functions.

The patent describes a method where a web site owner wants to rank for certain keywords in a search engine. The system makes suggestions to the site owner on how to edit his or her web site to rank better for these keywords, such as add the word to the title tag. It then automatically submits the sites to multiple search engines.

In another embodiment, the system would automatically edit the customer’s web page for better search engine rankings.

A number of businesses still offer search engine submission services, even though the importance of submitting a site for inclusion in search engines has decreased over the past decade. Automatically analyzing web sites and making suggestions for better search rankings is still popular, although much of the attention has shifted from what’s on the web site to external factors like who’s linking to it.


© DomainNameWire.com 2012. This is copyrighted content. Do not republish.

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How To Determine if Google’s Algorithm Changes are Aimed at You

February 28, 2011Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, google algorithm, SEO, UncategorizedComments Off on How To Determine if Google’s Algorithm Changes are Aimed at You

A handy guide to determine if Google is gunning for you.

Last week Google announced some changes to its algorithm that affect a whopping 12% of search results.

The target?

“low-quality sites—sites which are low-value add for users, copy content from other websites or sites that are just not very useful”

While some say this is aimed at so-called “content farms”, here are the warning signs that this change is aimed at your web site(s):

- You created your web site with the click of a button (or a few buttons)

- You didn’t create any original content for your web site

- Your web site asks questions but doesn’t provide answers — and is waiting for a “user” to generate the answer for you (ahem)

- When users do answer those questions, the answers suck (ahem)

- You developed a hundred sites in a weekend

- Although your web site presents existing information in a “unique” way, hundreds of other web sites have also tried to present that same information in a “unique” way

- Your web site is a splog

- Your content is similar to that found on other web sites; you just re-write it in a different way

- Your only plan for traffic generation is search traffic


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

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How To Determine if Google’s Algorithm Changes are Aimed at You

February 28, 2011Domaining, Domainnamewire, google, google algorithm, SEO, UncategorizedComments Off on How To Determine if Google’s Algorithm Changes are Aimed at You

A handy guide to determine if Google is gunning for you.

Last week Google announced some changes to its algorithm that affect a whopping 12% of search results.

The target?

“low-quality sites—sites which are low-value add for users, copy content from other websites or sites that are just not very useful”

While some say this is aimed at so-called “content farms”, here are the warning signs that this change is aimed at your web site(s):

- You created your web site with the click of a button (or a few buttons)

- You didn’t create any original content for your web site

- Your web site asks questions but doesn’t provide answers — and is waiting for a “user” to generate the answer for you (ahem)

- When users do answer those questions, the answers suck (ahem)

- You developed a hundred sites in a weekend

- Although your web site presents existing information in a “unique” way, hundreds of other web sites have also tried to present that same information in a “unique” way

- Your web site is a splog

- Your content is similar to that found on other web sites; you just re-write it in a different way

- Your only plan for traffic generation is search traffic


© DomainNameWire.com 2011.

Get Certified Parking Stats at DNW Certified Stats.

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Yahoo Files Patent App for Discovering SEO Link Spam

April 15, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, link spam, SEO, Uncategorized, yahooComments Off on Yahoo Files Patent App for Discovering SEO Link Spam

Search engine files patent application for methods of detecting link spam.

hyperlinkEver since people caught on to how Google used the number of incoming links to a web site in its ranking algorithms, people have tried to game the system. From selling links to creating link farms, SEO has focused much of its attention on link building over the years. As a result, the search engines have had to counter this by trying to separate good links from bad.

Yahoo has filed a patent for discovering abnormal link structures and demoting the rank of web pages based on these abnormal incoming links.

Titled “Detection of Undesirable Web Pages”, patent application 20100094868 (pdf) was filed in October 2008 and published today.

The patent describes a statistical method of determining when links pointing to a web page have been artificially generated. The method determines a normal range of links across a number of factors, and then looks for patterns that do not conform to the natural change in links over time:

As the value of the normalized entropy metric associated with a set of inlinks referencing the destination page approaches an outer limit of an acceptable range (e.g., 0 or 1), the likelihood that the set of inlinks to the destination web page is “unnatural” increases. In other words, there exists an inference that some of the inlinks among the set have been created for the purpose of artificial promotion of the destination web page rather than based on the genuine interests from a diverse set of independent users.

Some of the factors considered include:
-IP Address of link source
-Top level domain of links
-Language of each link (e.g. English, French, German)
-Autonomous system (i.e. a networked system of computing devices)
-Anchor text of links
-PageRank of incoming links
-Link age-attenuation weightings

Of course, many search engine optimization experts already try to skirt these measures by spreading links about in more natural ways. Further, I’d be surprised if some of Yahoo’s competitors weren’t using some of these same tactics before the patent application was filed.


© DomainNameWire.com 2009.

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Remember, No One Searches with Quotes

January 15, 2010Domain Services, Domaining, Domainnamewire, SEOComments Off on Remember, No One Searches with Quotes

Phrase searches are an important metric, but have their limitations.

When domainers try to determine the popularity of keywords in their domain names, they usually find the number of phrase match results at Google. To find this, you just search with “quotes around your keywords”. That tells Google to return results with the actual phrase inside your quotes, in the actual order.

This matters for domains because order matters. Consider the domain name GameFootball.com. You could say this term has 60 million results on Google, but that’s when you search without quotes because Google doesn’t care about the order of your search terms. Using quotes, you get less than a million results, which is a better indicator of popularity of the term and therefore the domain (as compared to FootballGame.com, a much better domain).

But when it comes to search engine optimization, remember this truth: hardly anyone searches with quotes. I suspect many readers of Domain Name Wire do, but DNW readers are web savvy. The typical web surfer doesn’t even know about using quotes when searching.

Why does this matter? When you’re tracking your rankings, you should search without quotes. I was reminded of this today when reviewing analytics for one of my web sites. I was getting a lot of traffic from phrases and checked my rankings on Google using quotes. I couldn’t find my site — until I dropped the quotes and found myself in the first few positions.

So remember: searching with quotes has important uses, but most searchers don’t use them.


© DomainNameWire.com 2009.

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The Number One SEO Secret

September 21, 2009Domaining, Domainnamewire, search engine optimization, SEO, UncategorizedComments Off on The Number One SEO Secret

The number one way to get search engine traffic to your web site.

Want to know a search engine optimization technique guaranteed to get “loads of traffic” to your web site? How to get “laser-targeted” visitors? I’m “going to spill the beans”.

It’s not the SEO secret Google doesn’t want you to know about. In fact, Google’s Matt Cutts has even publicly discussed this fantastic, white-hat technique to get better search rankings. You just missed it.

I’m about to disclose this secret, and I’m not going to charge you $97 $47 for an eBook (but my advice also doesn’t come with a money-back guarantee and I’m not going to show you a screenshot of my Clickbank account).

Ready. Here it is:

Create compelling content.

That’s right, folks. You didn’t hear it here first. Google has been telling you this for years, but if fell on deaf ears.

Here’s how this incredible system works. You create a web site, make it usable and valuable to web visitors, and build it up over time. You don’t farm out article writing to someone in India. You don’t copy articles from article directories. You don’t splog. You don’t stuff your meta tags. You actually create your web site with your visitor in mind.

Then a funny thing happens. People start linking to you naturally. It’s not like you can ask Microsoft, TechMeme, and TechCrunch to link to you. But if you create compelling content, they will.

There’s really only one drawback to this not-so-secret SEO trick: it takes time. You actually have to care about what you’re doing. But unlike other “tricks”, you won’t find that Google one day decides to drop you from its index.


© DomainNameWire.com 2009.

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