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Doh! Melbourne IT accidentally shut down Twitter’s t.co link shortener

October 9, 2012Domain Registrars, Domaining, Domainnamewire, Melbourne IT, t.co, twitterComments Off on Doh! Melbourne IT accidentally shut down Twitter’s t.co link shortener

Company placed domain status on hold thanks to phishing complaint.

Yesterday Twitter’s t.co link shortener, which it wraps all outgoing links in, went down.

Was the culprit some self-proclaimed anonymous user? Or a DDoS?

Nope. Domain name registrar Melbourne IT has fessed up to causing the problem.

The company, which is the registrar for t.co, admitted to CNET that one of its employees had temporarily taken the t.co domain name offline in response to a phishing complaint.

Yesterday in the process of actioning a phishing complaint, our policy team inadvertently placed the t.co domain on hold. The error was realized and rectified in approximately 40 minutes and t.co links again began working.

Whoops.

Hopefully the registrar will enact protections to prevent this from happening again.


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Are Bots Registering Twitter Handles Based on New Domain Registrations?

August 21, 2011Domaining, Domainnamewire, twitter, UncategorizedComments Off on Are Bots Registering Twitter Handles Based on New Domain Registrations?

It would be and easy process to automate.

When you finally find that perfect and available domain name, you’re not yet done securing your online identity. And someone might be lurking to “front run” your Twitter username.

That’s what Ross Duggan thinks happened to him. He finally found the perfect unregistered domain name for his new project. He checked on Twitter and the same handle was still available. So he registered the domain name.

When he returned a couple days later to register the Twitter username he found that it was taken. The user hadn’t done anything with the Twitter account other than register it.

It would be really easy for someone to front run your username. Getting new registration information typically takes a day if the frontrunner is downloading the zone file. But if they’re monitoring new entries to the DNS they could get the info faster.

I recommend getting your Twitter handle at the same time you register your domain.

Hat tip: Jorge Monasterio.


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Company Files Cybersquatting Claim Against Twitter Username

June 9, 2011anti-cybersquatting, Domaining, Domainnamewire, lawsuits, Policy & Law, twitterComments Off on Company Files Cybersquatting Claim Against Twitter Username

Can a Twitter username be cybersquatting? One insurance company thinks so.

TwitterHere’s an interesting lawsuit I just discovered that attempts to stretch the bounds of the Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection act.

Insurance company Conventry First has filed a federal lawsuit (pdf) against whomever is using the CoventryFirst username on Twitter, i.e. twitter.com/coventryfirst.

But in addition to complaining about plain old trademark infringement, the company has thrown in a charge of cybersquatting for using twitter.com/coventryfirst.

Now, besides the issue that Coventry First is suggesting that having a trademark in a URL directory of your web site can be cybersquatting, it seems to me that in a way they could ensnare Twitter in this battle. After all, it’s Twitter’s domain name that Conventry is considering to be a violation of the anti-cybersquatting act.

The lawsuit does not demand that the @coventryfirst username be transferred to Conventry First.

Just for kicks, I’m going to make this post’s URL include coventry-first.


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Why Twitter Singled Out TwitterSearch.com

December 5, 2010Domaining, Domainnamewire, Policy & Law, twitterComments Off on Why Twitter Singled Out TwitterSearch.com

Owner tried to “extort” Twitter.

As Robin Wauters wrote today, Twitter has filed a UDRP against the owner of TwitterSearch.com.

With so many domain names out there including “twitter” in them, why has the company singled out this one? I know the answer.

It turns out the owner of the domain name has been trying to sell the domain name for some time. Back in August a Domain Name Wire reader caught wind that the owner was trying to sell the domain name and let me know about it. Apparently the owner of TwitterSearch.com claimed “Twitter will buy it for a few hundred thousand dollars.”

Someone also let Twitter know about the sales pitch. A Twitter representative wrote back:

…I’ve been in touch with these people, and they’re very interested in extorting us and not very interested in working with us. Please regard their emails as spam and feel free to let me know if you have any further concerns.

My reader opined “I am sure Twitter will take action against the owner of the domain in a UDRP.”

He was right. I suspect the registrant trying to “extort” twitter is why this UDRP was filed. Now the company will get the domain name for about $1,500 in UDRP fees. So this case doesn’t necessarily mean people with twitter in their domain names need to run for the hills — although I’d recommend being careful if your product is related to the service.

The domain name is currently protected by whois privacy, but the original registrant of TwitterSearch.com was Popvox, LLC. It’s the same registrant of TwitterVision.com.


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MSNBC Buys BreakingNews.com to Complement Twitter Handle

January 5, 2010Domain Sales, Domaining, Domainnamewire, twitterComments Off on MSNBC Buys BreakingNews.com to Complement Twitter Handle

With Twitter handle in hand, MSNBC buys matching BreakingNews.com domain name.

File this under breaking news: the MSNBC Digital Network has purchased the domain name BreakingNews.com.

What makes this interesting is that the purchase seems to have originated from MSNBC’s use of the @breakingnews twitter handle, which has over 1.5 million followers.

The acquisition is a big win for PV Media Group, which launched the BreakingNews web site a little over a year ago. I interviewed BreakingNews.com CEO James McDonald when the site launched, and it was clear that McDonald understood the value of a great domain name:

“Our brand will be built anytime there is breaking news anywhere,” McDonald said at the time.

BreakingNews.com is obviously a great domain name for MSNBC. But I also find this acquisition unique from a Twitter perspective. Most of the time people have a domain and try to get the Twitter handle to match it; this time the company had the twitter handle and wanted the matching domain name.


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MSNBC Buys BreakingNews.com to Complement Twitter Handle

January 5, 2010breakingnews.com, Domain Sales, Domaining, Domainnamewire, msnbc, twitterComments Off on MSNBC Buys BreakingNews.com to Complement Twitter Handle

With Twitter handle in hand, MSNBC buys matching BreakingNews.com domain name.

File this under breaking news: the MSNBC Digital Network has purchased the domain name BreakingNews.com.

What makes this interesting is that the purchase seems to have originated from MSNBC’s use of the @breakingnews twitter handle, which has over 1.5 million followers.

The acquisition is a big win for PV Media Group, which launched the BreakingNews web site a little over a year ago. I interviewed BreakingNews.com CEO James McDonald when the site launched, and it was clear that McDonald understood the value of a great domain name:

“Our brand will be built anytime there is breaking news anywhere,” McDonald said at the time.

BreakingNews.com is obviously a great domain name for MSNBC. But I also find this acquisition unique from a Twitter perspective. Most of the time people have a domain and try to get the Twitter handle to match it; this time the company had the twitter handle and wanted the matching domain name.


© DomainNameWire.com 2009.

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Related posts:

  1. BreakingNews.com: a Great Domain Drives the Business
  2. 1 Million Tweets: Clever Twitter Idea
  3. Why I’m Not Going to Follow You on Twitter

Why I’m Not Going to Follow You on Twitter

December 16, 2009Domaining, Domainnamewire, twitter, UncategorizedComments Off on Why I’m Not Going to Follow You on Twitter

A few quick ways to make sure I don’t follow you on Twitter.

I use twitter daily. Not only do I post my recent blog posts, interesting articles, retweets of other’s tweets, and my thoughts, but I use it to get story ideas.

But I have a few pet peeves:

1. My main pet peeve is someone who follows you just to try to get you to follow them back. Follow me because you’re interested in what I have to say, not because you want me to follow you back. The worst are people that follow you and notice you aren’t following them back, who then unfollow and refollow to try to get your attention again.

2. Another pet peeve sure to get you unfollowed is posting too often. There’s no magic number to me, but I’ve unfollowed a lot of people who tweet every few minutes (unless I find them very relevant).

3. The third pet peeve is the person who only posts ads about their business. Like this one. That doesn’t add value.

So here’s how I decide to follow someone back that follows me. First, if I know the person or company I’ll likely follow them back. But 99% of the time I don’t. So then I look at two numbers: number of followers and number following. The ratio is what’s important. If they are following more people than are following them, that’s a red flag. That’s a good sign they aren’t very interesting.

Right now I have about 1,000 followers and I’m following 126 people. That’s about 10 to 1. When I see someone who’s following 1,000 people and only has 100 followers, that’s a red flag, and I won’t follow them back.

What are some of your pet peeves on twitter? How do you decide who to follow?

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